Daily

A Fracking Fiasco

A Fracking Fiasco

|

Fracking, a fossil-fuel extraction technique in which drilling companies inject high-pressure liquids (frackwater) into the ground to break open rock formations containing oil or gas, is known to have detrimental effects on the environment. Frackwater can contain a myriad of chemicals including benzene and xylene as well as potentially dangerous  … Read More

Unprecedented Charges in Flint

Unprecedented Charges in Flint

|

While I feel a tremendous sense of responsibility to do my job well and report information accurately in my role as editor, when I mess up or fail to act, a comma is misplaced or a person’s name misspelled. It’s unfortunate, but nobody dies.

The charges recently brought against five Michigan  … Read More

Crops on Drugs

Crops on Drugs

|

I learned recently that approximately 40% of the world’s food is cultivated in irrigated areas and that 10% of the world’s population consumes food irrigated with wastewater.

This realization made me wonder: how safe is it to irrigate crops with wastewater? And, after a bit of research, it appears that there  … Read More

Equipment Rental: Is Borrowing Best? – Part 1

Equipment Rental: Is Borrowing Best? – Part 1

|

Since 1993, the equipment rental industry has more than doubled in size—from $11.2 billion to $22 billion. Just 10 years before that, equipment rental was a $1.1-billion industry.

Industry experts say that a combination of factors is responsible for this sizable boost, most notably the construction booms of the late 1980s  … Read More

Fueled by Flowers

Fueled by Flowers

|

A field of golden sunflowers stretches along the Neuse River Greenway in Raleigh, North Carolina. Their faces shift, following the sun’s path overhead.  

“Right now it looks like a sea of gold,” Tim Woody, superintendent of the Neuse River Resource Recovery Facility, told North Carolina Public Radio.

The flowers—one of several  … Read More

A Gradual Atlantis

A Gradual Atlantis

|

Among researchers who study the potential effects of rising sea levels, and among the city planners in coastal areas who are actively trying to come up with viable plans for their communities, the idea of retreat is catching on. The alternative is to build physical defenses—costly sea walls, levees, or  … Read More

When Will the Sun Set on Solar Subsidies?

When Will the Sun Set on Solar Subsidies?

|

For the past several years, the solar industry has been on a tear. The aggressive tax incentive is set to step down  from 30% to 10% in 2016 before it goes away completely at the end of 2017. Some solar CEOs are lobbying for another extension of the Solar Investment Tax  … Read More

Duking It Out in Public

Duking It Out in Public

|

Where do you stand on climate change? Is the issue settled? Do you think there are still some uncertainties to be cleared up?

Last week I wrote about a recent report on the science behind sea level rise; the authors of that report explain the models and data they’re using to  … Read More

Domino Effect: Diablo Canyon’s Decommissioning

Domino Effect: Diablo Canyon’s Decommissioning

|

Nuclear generation makes up about 20% of the United States’ energy supply. While nuclear plants are in-line with current carbon-free environmental goals, positive attributes, such as grid stability and consistent base load are often overlooked. As a result, today, they are struggling to compete.

In May, at a US Department of  … Read More

Efficient Effluent: Blending Wastewater for Ag Reuse

Efficient Effluent: Blending Wastewater for Ag Reuse

|

It’s estimated that 70% of freshwater withdrawals worldwide are for agricultural use. Although some see recycled wastewater as a potential solution component to global water scarcity issues, the costs of treating wastewater—to remove contaminants, reduce crop-damaging salts, and to meet health standards for reuse—often present financial limitations.

A new economic model  … Read More

We’re at War and Most of Us Don’t Seem to Care

We’re at War and Most of Us Don’t Seem to Care

|

Last Sunday’s New York Times article, “It’s No Accident: Advocates Want to Speak of Car ‘Crashes’ Instead,” hit the nail on the head by suggesting that people, not some intergalactic demonic force, are responsible for all but 6% of the 38,000 roadway fatalities in 2015. What’s behind the 6% not  … Read More

The Very Last Straw

The Very Last Straw

|

Many cities and some states have banned single-use plastic shopping bags. The next item on the list? It could be the plastic drinking straw.

Cities and states that have banned plastic bags have done so for several reasons—they’re not biodegradable; they contribute to landfill waste—but one of the most-cited has been  … Read More

Some Random Facts About Water Harvesting

Some Random Facts About Water Harvesting

|

In May 2016, the governor of Colorado signed a bill legalizing rain barrels. Before then, the capture and use of rainwater, even on so small a scale, was illegal in Colorado. It wasn’t the first time such a bill had been proposed—a similar effort failed last year—and the decision, hailed  … Read More

It’s Manslaughter

It’s Manslaughter

|

Last week, as you’ve probably heard, five people in Michigan were charged with involuntary manslaughter for circumstances related to the Flint water crisis—specifically for their failure to sound the alert about increases in the number of cases of Legionnaires’ disease. It’s believed that pipes corroded by the city’s new source  … Read More

Turning a Blind Eye: Sea Rise and the Air Force’s Billion-Dollar Project

Turning a Blind Eye: Sea Rise and the Air Force’s Billion-Dollar Project

|

The Space Fence, a sophisticated surveillance system designed to improve the way the US Air Force identifies and tracks objects in space, is under construction and scheduled for operation by 2018. The radar installation addresses the growing problem of space debris, an issue that became reality in 2009 when a  … Read More

How Much Regulation Is Too Much?

How Much Regulation Is Too Much?

|

As many new presidential administrations do, Donald Trump’s is promising to take action on improving the country’s infrastructure. How fast it can move ahead might depend on which environmental and other regulations stay and which ones go.

This recent article from the Wall Street Journal titled “Speed Limits Await Infrastructure Spree” looks  … Read More

Conversion and Recycling: Friends or Foes?

Conversion and Recycling: Friends or Foes?

|

This is a question many have asked, particularly over the past decade as the concern for energy resources again reared its ugly head. Given the opposition to WTE by those claiming to speak on behalf of the “environmental community,” those favoring the development of alternative practices to accompany recycling efforts  … Read More

Sharks in the Sewer

Sharks in the Sewer

|

Global sea levels are rising at an astonishing rate—a pace that increases with each climbing degree of warmth that our planet experiences. The inevitability of saltwater influx means that in the future, humans will have to rethink, rebuild, and relocate infrastructural systems, potable water sources, and in some cases entire  … Read More

“It’s Not What a Leader Does, It’s What He Is”

“It’s Not What a Leader Does, It’s What He Is”

|

For our March/April 2013 issue’s Editor’s Comments I wrote a piece on leadership that received not only the highest number of responses of any in all the magazine’s history, but was also picked up by other publications for reprinting. I regard why this was so as one of those mysteries  … Read More

Dick Townley—The Passing of Another GRCDA/SWANA Icon

Dick Townley—The Passing of Another GRCDA/SWANA Icon

|

I, along with many of you, was saddened to learn of Dick Townley’s passing this past weekend. I know that he was a Californian and an expert at many things, a list that included laughing a lot, at the same time taking his longstanding role in waste management matters seriously. I  … Read More

Energy in Every Droplet

Energy in Every Droplet

|

The intersection of water and energy is an interface that in the water industry we often explore in terms of operational efficiencies, conservation policies, and cost perspectives. But on a micro scale, the water-energy nexus is encapsulated within a single molecule. And the research surrounding the separation of this molecule’s  … Read More

Groundwater for Google

Groundwater for Google

|

Data centers use water for cooling hot servers and electrical equipment—an Olympic-sized swimming pool every two days, in fact, according to Data Center Dynamics.  

Air exiting electrical equipment is cooled by passing though an air/liquid heat exchanger. The liquid coolant picks up heat from the exchanger on its way to  … Read More

Tankless Water Heaters Are Here to Stay

Tankless Water Heaters Are Here to Stay

|

When it’s time to replace a water heater—or put one into a newly constructed building—facility managers can choose between the traditional storage tank heater or a tankless water heater.

Tankless water heaters, also known as demand-type water heaters, can provide endless hot water only as it is needed and used, points  … Read More

Flooding Fields for Aquifer Recharge

Flooding Fields for Aquifer Recharge

|

During the recent drought, California farmers pumped so much groundwater that the water table dropped by 10 to 20 feet in some places, and up to 100 feet in others. Aquifers were depleted. Wells ran dry. And then, as if by some miracle, it rained.

This winter, storms have delivered rainfall  … Read More

Potential Threat: Antimicrobials

Potential Threat: Antimicrobials

|

For the most part, antibiotics play a positive role in the modern world. They help combat infection and keep us healthy. However, antibiotics often find their way into water streams and wastewater treatment plants while still biologically active. And that’s a problem for a variety of reasons.  … Read More

Trump Navigates Ambiguous Waters

Trump Navigates Ambiguous Waters

|

What exactly does “navigable” mean? Vague definitions of which bodies of water are protected by federal agencies have confounded policy makers for decades. In 1972, the Clean Water Act gave federal authorities the power to regulate pollution in “navigable waters.” The job of determining which of those waters the policy  … Read More

A Serpentine Path: Tracing a River’s Regulation

A Serpentine Path: Tracing a River’s Regulation

|

A GIS map of America’s rivers captivated me this week, offering the sort of arresting omniscience that puts entire systems in perspective. I gazed at the map’s colorful capillaries with wonder. To visualize a nation in terms of its interconnected waterways is illuminating.

Photo courtesy of Imgur  … Read More

Finger Pointing in Florida

Finger Pointing in Florida

|

As gloppy, green cyanobacteria overtake southern Florida’s waterways, a debate has erupted over whom is to blame for the state’s algae bloom emergency.

It’s a perfect storm, really, and the sort of environmental nightmare that happens precisely when water management issues and inadequate infrastructure funding collide.  … Read More

Whose Job Is It Anyway?

Whose Job Is It Anyway?

|

I recently saw something on a reputable news website that has me appalled. There allegedly is some wheeling and dealing going on, and I would like to hear from you. But first a heads up, I’m going to keep the names of people and businesses out, in an attempt to drop  … Read More

Do We Really Care Where Our Stuff Goes?

Do We Really Care Where Our Stuff Goes?

|

I do, so a question I’ve asked over the years is, “Why don’t municipalities make accurate accounting a contractual requirement?” To date, I’ve yet to receive an answer, which makes me wonder whether the public really give a darn. Perhaps the real question is whether I’m out of my proper  … Read More

The Economics of Recycling in the US—Can It Pay for Itself?

The Economics of Recycling in the US—Can It Pay for Itself?

|

Has recycling in the United States stalled? How dire is the situation? Industry executives have argued force­fully that prices for recycling commodities have largely fallen to the point over the past several years that it is not economical for them to process recyclables and market them to largely Asian markets,  … Read More

CTs: Why, Where, What, and When (Number 1)

CTs: Why, Where, What, and When (Number 1)

|

Last week’s 2016 Southern California Conversion Technology Conference (SCCTC) put on by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works (LACDPW) focused on the need for the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) to rescind its exclusion from full diversion credit of thermochemical CTs for treating MSW feedstocks.  … Read More

NASA Earth’s City Lights: A World Lit by More Than Fire

NASA Earth’s City Lights: A World Lit by More Than Fire

|

I was drawn to NASA’s wonderful Earth’s city lights mosaic more than two decades ago by the sheer beauty of the familiar, yet haunting, pattern showing the purposeful hand of human effort. As my computer’s wallpaper it has become a talisman of sorts, in much the same way I’ve come  … Read More

Foolhardy or Forward-Thinking: What’s Elon Musk’s End-Game?

Foolhardy or Forward-Thinking: What’s Elon Musk’s End-Game?

|

It’s a conundrum. Elon Musk’s plan for his electric-vehicle company, Tesla Motors, to acquire solar developer SolarCity is a move many find puzzling—mostly because both companies are losing money. The Wall Street Journal reports that Tesla lost nearly $900 million in 2015, while SolarCity lost almost $769 million. Combining two  … Read More

Landfill Economics: Getting Down to Business – Part 2

Landfill Economics: Getting Down to Business – Part 2

|

Editor’s Note: This article was first published in the July/August 2005 issue of MSW Management. This series of three articles examines the costs involved in each stage of a generic landfill’s lifetime, shows how to do pro forma statements for profit and loss, and analyzes the tax and financial aspects  … Read More

Consumer Mistrust Is the Message in the Bottle

Consumer Mistrust Is the Message in the Bottle

|

For the first time ever, sales of bottled water exceeded soda in 2016, with a total of 49.4 billion bottles sold in the US. According to the New York Times, that means that Americans drank almost 12 billion gallons of bottled water last year, or more than 36 gallons per  … Read More

Foretelling a Post-Water Future

Foretelling a Post-Water Future

|

It seems like a passage from Latin American fiction—a surreal scenario in which citizens awaken to find their country dry, and a mustached general rationing their water. But for citizens of La Paz, Bolivia, this is not a Gabriel Garcia Marquez novel—it is their reality.

For eleven years, scientists like Edson  … Read More

Pipe Dream

Pipe Dream

|

Last week Governor Jerry Brown’s $15 billion plan to construct two tunnels to convey water from northern California to southern California achieved early approval from federal wildlife officials. The support represents a step forward in a complex approval process.

The tunnels—each four stories high and 35 miles long—would collect water  … Read More

A Game-Changing Opportunity

A Game-Changing Opportunity

|

Energy Storage Solutions’ parent, Forester Media, has had a foot in the renewable energy door from day one in 1991 with its initial publication, MSW (Municipal Solid Waste) Management’s involvement with waste-to-energy (WTE) and landfill-gas-to-energy (LFGTE) activities. More recently, these endeavors have been joined by a variety of energy-from-waste practices,  … Read More

Lessons From a Lock

Lessons From a Lock

|

The Panama Canal is an engineering marvel. The 48-mile, manmade waterway connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans is a system of colossal locks that gravity fills and empties to raise ships 85 feet and lower them back to sea level. The structure is a gateway essential to the global maritime  … Read More

A Nuclear Nosedive?

A Nuclear Nosedive?

|

Westinghouse Electric Co. LLC, the US nuclear power plant developer owned by Japanese electronics giant, Toshiba Corporation, consulted bankruptcy attorneys last week. While this action may not seem headline-worthy to some, it is certain to have widespread implications for the nuclear power industry—and it may even be indicative of future  … Read More

Supply and Demand: Does Water Capitalism Offer a Solution?

Supply and Demand: Does Water Capitalism Offer a Solution?

|

It never ceases to amaze me that two tiny hydrogen ions, hand-in-hand with oxygen, form one of the earth’s most precious resources—a molecule essential to all life.

With rising demand and diminishing supply, the value of this vital liquid continuously compounds. Water usage worldwide has steadily increased at more than twice  … Read More

PCBs in Contaminated Sediments

PCBs in Contaminated Sediments

|

PCB sold in huge quantities around the world. Scientists continued to experiment and found the properties of the substance could be enhanced. With added carbon atoms and chlorine mass, PCB became a nearly waxy substance, ideal as an extender for pesticides to increase their adhesion when sprayed. And it lasts—resistant  … Read More

A Cascading Failure

A Cascading Failure

|

More than a decade ago, federal and state officials and some of California’s largest water agencies dismissed concerns that the spillway at Oroville Dam could erode during heavy winter rains. But on February 12, more than 185,000 people were evacuated from areas downstream of the dam, because of concern over its structural  … Read More

LED Lighting for Energy Savings

LED Lighting for Energy Savings

|

At the Moorpark Unified School District in Moorpark, CA, Gary Ventsam, director of maintenance and facilities, was weighing energy savings options. The choice came down to installing solar or doing a lighting retrofit with LEDs. At one point, there had been some concerns over LED brightness, clarity, and different colors,  … Read More

Limited Parking

Limited Parking

|

Did you drive to work this morning? Was a parking space waiting for you when you arrived? Many cities require developers to provide a minimum number of parking spaces for office, retail, and residential buildings; sometimes the number is based on the square footage of the building, sometimes on occupancy.  … Read More

Why Microgrids Are Inevitable

Why Microgrids Are Inevitable

|

The fledgling electric utility companies that emerged after Thomas Edison opened his small Pearl Street, New York City, NY, power station in 1882 originally focused on distributed energy generation (DEG) operating within a microgrid. Edison envisioned that the electric utility industry would involve small firms generating direct current (DC) power  … Read More

Three Types of Slope Failures in Landfills

Three Types of Slope Failures in Landfills

|

In March 1996 outside of Cincinnati, OH, the worst landslide in solid waste industry history occurred, resulting in a mass movement of more than 1 million cubic yards, a distance greater than 300 yards. Similarly, disastrous slides have occurred around the world: Hiriya, Israel, in the winter of 1997; the  … Read More