Water

Desalination

Desalination in the Age of Water Scarcity

Desalination in the Age of Water Scarcity

|

At least a dozen different desalination technologies exist. Distillation was the first—used thousands of years ago, and the most common through the 1990s. The process involves evaporating water by thermal or vacuum methods, thereby leaving solids behind, and condensing the desalted vapor into liquid form.  … Read More

Thirst Outweighs Taste

Thirst Outweighs Taste

|

At a restaurant inside the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, water sommelier Martin Riese outlines the mineral content, flavor profile, ideal pairing, and origin for each crystalline bottle on the restaurant’s 40-page water menu. Only in California could the subtle differences in a glass of water be celebrated with  … Read More

Call for Papers for the International Desalination Association’s Conference

Call for Papers for the International Desalination Association’s Conference

|

The Call for Papers for the International Desalination Association’s International Conference on Water Reuse and Recycling “Turning Vision into Reality” is open through March 31. The conference, which takes place September 25-27, 2016 at the Hyatt Regency Nice Palais de la Méditeranée in Nice, France, covers leading edge strategies and  … Read More

Parched: Can Desalination Quench the World’s Thirst?

Parched: Can Desalination Quench the World’s Thirst?

|

In 1790, when Thomas Jefferson was Secretary of State, he held a bottle of “purified” seawater to his lips and drank. The water in the bottle tasted only slightly better than untreated salt water, but the potential of this discovery piqued his interest.

Desalination seemed a possible solution to a myriad  … Read More

Can Desalination Save Us From Drought?

Can Desalination Save Us From Drought?

|

Perhaps no one captured the vision as well as John F. Kennedy.

“If we could ever competitively, at a cheap rate, get freshwater from saltwater,” he said in a 1961 press conference, “it would be in the long-range interests of humanity, which would really dwarf any other scientific accomplishments. I am  … Read More



Enter Your Log In Credentials
×