Soil

Erosion Control Weekly

The Low-Down on Dirt

The Low-Down on Dirt

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Monday, December 5, was World Soil Day. Proposed by the International Union of Soil Sciences back in 2002 and adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 2013, World Soil Day has been used to raise awareness of soil—something the great majority of people take for granted—as a vital resource.  … Read More

George Washington Argued Here

George Washington Argued Here

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We’ve seen them often enough in other parts of the country, and now one is flaring up on the Potomac River: a battle over water rights. The origins of this one go back almost four centuries and involve an agreement negotiated in 1785 by George Washington years before he became  … Read More

Erosion Control—Reader Favorites

Erosion Control—Reader Favorites

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Listed below are the top Editor Blogs, Reader Favorite articles, and Erosion Control magazine articles for you to enjoy. This list is curated based on reader views, search traffic, e-mail click-through, and most commented articles.

Bookmark this page so you will always have quick access to Forester Media’s top Erosion Control  … Read More

Rain Gardens for Erosion Control Projects

Rain Gardens for Erosion Control Projects

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Before we had the rain gardens in, everything was draining straight into the gray infrastructure in the way of storm sewers and getting taken rapidly into Trail Creek, which is a heavily used natural resource and recreational area for a lot of people. This was a great opportunity to help  … Read More

102 Million Trees Gone

102 Million Trees Gone

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The trees are dying.

We’ve known it for a while; in California’s forests, because of the ongoing drought, trees are dying by the millions. What wasn’t clear was the scale at which it’s happening. The latest aerial survey from the US Forest Service shows that the state has about 102  … Read More

How Trackout and Wheel-Washing Systems Can Improve Profitability

How Trackout and Wheel-Washing Systems Can Improve Profitability

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Contractors who use trackout cleanup equipment such as automatic wheel-washing systems merely to comply with environmental site regulations may be taking the wrong approach. Plenty of reasons exist for “taking the high road” and adopting these systems—namely minimizing operating costs, which can allow for more competitive bidding, and maintaining a  … Read More

Keeping Water Quality High

Keeping Water Quality High

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Snowy plovers are dainty little shorebirds, waders that scurry along beaches on legs that look like twigs. The timid plovers have white underbodies with brown feathers on top. The brown markings around their faces give them a quizzical look, somewhat like owls.  … Read More

Improving the Soil

Improving the Soil

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In revegetation, everything begins with the soil—usually poor soil.

Soils may become degraded during the construction of buildings, roadside projects, or mining or landfill operations, or because of overgrazing or deforestation. They lose their topsoil, usually the top 2- to 8-inch layer of the soil, where the most important nutrients lie.  … Read More

Got a Mask? It’s  Still Wildfire Season

Got a Mask? It’s Still Wildfire Season

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Large parts of the Southeast are on fire this week, with tens of thousands of acres affected by wildfires. Even many of those who aren’t forced to evacuate are still struggling with the effects of poor air quality—so much so that officials in some areas are recommending people wear special  … Read More

Slightly Less Dammed

Slightly Less Dammed

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We’ve covered the pros and cons of dam removal projects in the past, but less so the consequences of building dams; one exception is this account of a writer’s trip to China during the construction of the Three Gorges project.

The main reason, of course, for building large dams has  … Read More

Constructed Wetlands for Erosion Control and Stormwater Mitigation

Constructed Wetlands for Erosion Control and Stormwater Mitigation

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Many people think of wetlands as smelly, mosquito-ridden nuisances, but healthy wetlands provide habitat for birds, fish, amphibians, bats, and other insects that live on mosquitoes. Wetlands are home to more than one-third of the United States’ threatened and endangered species, according to EPA.  … Read More

Chemical Soil Stabilization – Part 1

Chemical Soil Stabilization – Part 1

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Despite all the work done by earthmoving equipment, each year wind and rain move much more soil than man could ever hope to shovel. And because soil is a finite commodity, one has to hold on to as much of it as possible.

Plantings aid in this quest; the roots of  … Read More

Geogrids for Stabilizing Steep Slopes

Geogrids for Stabilizing Steep Slopes

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The steep slopes and compressible soils caused concern that the road might, sometime in the future, shift and even crack if precast concrete panel retaining walls were used. Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) officials suggested that 1:1 slope reinforcement with geogrid be used instead.  … Read More



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