Soil

Erosion Control Weekly

Is Your Groundwater Corrosive?

Is Your Groundwater Corrosive?

|

Last week Laura Sanchez, editor of our sister publication Water Efficiency, wrote about the state of our nation’s municipal water supplies. A recent survey showed that nearly 2,000 water systems, spanning all 50 states, have shown excessive levels of lead in the past four years, and consumers in some of  … Read More

Gonna Get Burned

Gonna Get Burned

|

Chances are—especially if you’re in a Western state—you’ve been not all that far from a wildfire sometime in the last few years, perhaps close enough to hear planes passing overhead to dump loads of water and fire-retardant chemicals.

We know how difficult it can be to deal with the after effects  … Read More

Retaining Walls: What You See and What You Don’t – Part 1

Retaining Walls: What You See and What You Don’t – Part 1

|

Site conditions dictate a variety of solutions.

What you see with many retaining walls these days is a fashion statement. No one likes to see just a concrete wall, and the facial elements of retaining walls have changed radically within the past two decades, just as pavers have changed the way  … Read More

From the Dead Zone to the Buffer Zone

From the Dead Zone to the Buffer Zone

|

Algae blooms, eutrophication, and dead zones are a problem in many of the world’s oceans. Runoff from the Mississippi River contributes to a dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico that, in some years, exceeds the size of a smallish state, and last summer an algae bloom in the Pacific  … Read More

Revegetation After a Wildfire

Revegetation After a Wildfire

|

It was the setting for a perfect disaster: historic level droughts, acres of dry forest and grassland, huge reserves of dead wood fuel, and a hurricane that sucked any moisture from the air. Locals said it was just “powder-keg dry.”

“All it needed was an ignition source,” recalls Daniel Lewis, staff  … Read More

A Black Market for Sand?

A Black Market for Sand?

|

What is the one resource the modern world uses more of than anything else except air and water? It’s probably not the first thing that comes to mind. It’s sand. And we’re running out of it.

As this New York Times op-ed piece points out, sand isn’t just for the desert;  … Read More

Just Enough and No More

Just Enough and No More

|

Even with an almost-normal year of rain, some states are still experiencing drought and will be for the foreseeable future. Runoff from snowmelt in California’s Sierra Mountains is less than expected. And although the state has somewhat relaxed its restrictions on water use, conservation is still critical.

This blog from the  … Read More

It’s Alive! (And It Wants to Hear From You)

It’s Alive! (And It Wants to Hear From You)

|

Living shorelines: They’re not new, but the idea is gaining ground, so to speak, in the ongoing quest for ways to protect our coastlines and stop or even reverse coastal erosion.

Despite the name, living shorelines can involve much more than just plants and organic material. They can combine structural elements  … Read More

Project Profile: Cleaning Up in Colorado

Project Profile: Cleaning Up in Colorado

|

No matter the location on time of year, weather presents its own special challenges, and no industry knows this better than the construction industry. One of the bigger problems is often not as apparent, but can have major consequences if not taken seriously.  … Read More

Project Profile: Reseeding 40 Miles of Pipeline

Project Profile: Reseeding 40 Miles of Pipeline

|

A recent-multi-agency PROJECT involving several sediment and erosion control methods in various soil conditions during a natural gas pipeline project was one of the most challenging projects for Florida Hydroseeding & Erosion Control (FHEC).  … Read More

Two Thousand Sheep and a Camera-Shy Elk

Two Thousand Sheep and a Camera-Shy Elk

|

It all started, apparently, with sheep—lots and lots of sheep. In 1869, a young man named John Muir—now remembered as a famous naturalist and co-founder of the Sierra Club—was living and taking on odd jobs in Yosemite Valley. There was already a state park at Yosemite, but the protection California  … Read More

Coastal Concerns

Coastal Concerns

|

The storm forces of rain and wind, to say nothing of tidal ebbs and flows, pose special problems in controlling erosion along coastlines. All of these forces affect the surrounding area—beaches, roads, bridges, homes, and other buildings—as well.  … Read More



Enter Your Log In Credentials
×