Water

Stormwater Weekly

Here We Go Again—Fees and Taxes

Here We Go Again—Fees and Taxes

|

By some estimates, more than 1,400 stormwater utilities now exist in the US, but each time a community attempts to set one up, it’s a new process all over again—introducing residents and potential ratepayers to the concept, enlisting the support of elected officials, setting up a rate structure. And each  … Read More

Stormwater – Reader Favorites

Stormwater – Reader Favorites

|

Listed below are the top Editor blogs, Reader Favorite articles, and Stormwater magazine articles for you to enjoy. This list is curated based on reader views, search traffic, email click-through, and most commented articles.

Bookmark this page so you will always have quick access to Forester Media’s top Stormwater content.  … Read More

“Mildly Radioactive”

“Mildly Radioactive”

|

Those of us concerned with surface water quality generally keep a wary eye on the amount of nutrients entering our lakes and rivers. Nitrogen and phosphorus from fertilizers—much of it from agricultural lands, some from urban stormwater runoff—are a big contributor to algae blooms and dead zones, and in high  … Read More

Who Should Pay? Navigating the Narrow Path to Fair Utility Fees

Who Should Pay? Navigating the Narrow Path to Fair Utility Fees

|

We’ve published quite a few articles about the thorny process of setting up a stormwater utility, about what works and what—sometimes spectacularly—fails. Although utilities are a good way for a city to generate a reliable, steady income, they often meet with resistance from a whole lot of people—from residents who  … Read More

Foliar Rainfall Factors

Foliar Rainfall Factors

|

Trees and forest systems play an important role in the water cycle by intercepting rainfall and regulating water flow to the soil for more efficient stormwater infiltration. Traditional urban development practices have reduced the function of these systems by eliminating the vertical structure (tree canopy cover), removing existing ground cover  … Read More

Driverless Buses and the Big Stormwater Picture

Driverless Buses and the Big Stormwater Picture

|

There’s no doubt that technology is changing the way we work, the way we live, and, very possibly, the way we’re going to move between the two—how we literally get from place to place. Our future modes of transportation might look a bit different from what most of us expected.  … Read More

Green Infrastructure Stormwater BMPs

Green Infrastructure Stormwater BMPs

|

The primary objective of these green infrastructure projects were to design and construct two green infrastructure stormwater BMPs to treat nitrogen, and to monitor both BMPs for a period of years to evaluate stormwater flows and water-quality parameters.  … Read More

How Far We’ve Come

How Far We’ve Come

|

It’s a good idea every now and then to stop and evaluate what you’ve been doing, and EPA has recently done just that with its National Nonpoint Source Program. Since the late 1980s the agency has been encouraging, mandating—and in some cases funding, through Section 319 grants—control of nonpoint-source pollutants.  … Read More

This Lawsuit Could Happen to You

This Lawsuit Could Happen to You

|

A recent news item highlights once again the dangers much of our stormwater infrastructure can present—and the responsibility we have to protect people from it and, sometimes, from themselves.

A family in Pennsylvania has filed a lawsuit against Radnor Township for injuries their son suffered five years ago as a  … Read More

PCBs in Contaminated Sediments

PCBs in Contaminated Sediments

|

Editor’s note: This article first appeared in the March/April 2016 edition of Stormwater.

Throughout the 1800s, skies over European cities were dark with the smoke of burning coal. In Britain alone, dense populations, a shortage of wood, and new commerce derived from steam power “fueled” coal’s use from 50 million tons in  … Read More

Are We Really That Bad at Predicting the Weather?

Are We Really That Bad at Predicting the Weather?

|

In the wake of Hurricane Matthew, a New York Times article claims that US government weather forecasters are woefully inadequate at predicting the course of hurricanes and other meteorological events. For example, as late as September 29, the National Hurricane Center predicted that Matthew—then a Category 1 hurricane—would strengthen only slightly within  … Read More

The StormCon 2017 Call for Papers Is Open

The StormCon 2017 Call for Papers Is Open

|

StormCon, the only North American event dedicated exclusively to stormwater, is now accepting abstracts for the 2017 conference. The deadline to submit an abstract is Wednesday, December 7, 2016.

StormCon will take place in Seattle, WA, August 27–31, 2017. The conference venue, the Meydenbauer Center, is actually located in Bellevue, WA—home  … Read More



Enter Your Log In Credentials
×