Tag: bank erosion

Bank erosion is another type of water erosion and is defined as erosion of the bank of a stream or waterway. As you learned, surface water runoff always moves toward the lowest level due to gravity. Therefore, low-lying streams, rivers and even constructed drainage channels collect water runoff.

Fluvial Geomorphology (for Those Who Skipped It in College)

Fluvial Geomorphology (for Those Who Skipped It in College)

Whether you’re working on a water resources project, stream restoration, bank stabilization, or simply are looking to brush up on the fluvial geomorphology basics…you’re in luck. We’re diving beyond the surface of fluvial geomorphology and into the depths to catch you up with the latest theories, approaches, and tools.

Join two-time former

Saving Streams

Saving Streams

As streambanks erode over time, erosion control specialists are called in to mitigate the problem with approaches that may include hard armor or a softer approach, such as bioengineering. The long-term goal—as well as costs, function, permeability, flexibility, and aesthetics—often dictate the approach.

Protecting Coral in Guánica Bay
One project in Puerto

Bangladesh Undertakes Coastal Protection Projects

Amersfoort, the Netherlands, 5 January 2015 – International engineering and project management consultancy Royal HaskoningDHV has signed a €10.5 million contract with the Bangladesh Water Development Board for engineering consultancy services to protect Bangladesh’s vulnerable coastal zone, home to millions of people. The next six years Royal HaskoningDHV will be

Study: 100-Foot Buffers Keep Streams Healthy

AVONDALE, Pa., June 17, 2014 — Streamside forest buffers, long considered a best management practice, should be at least 100 feet wide on each side to adequately protect freshwater ecosystems from human activities according to an extensive scientific literature review published in the June issue of Journal of American Water

Study: 100-Foot Buffers Keep Streams Healthy

AVONDALE, Pa., June 17, 2014 – Streamside forest buffers, long considered a best management practice, should be at least 100 feet wide on each side to adequately protect freshwater ecosystems from human activities according to an extensive scientific literature review published in the June issue of Journal of American Water

Rain Garden Monitoring

Rain Garden Monitoring

Rain gardens are a popular green infrastructure choice. But until recently, not much was known about their actual performance. That knowledge could help public and private entities decide where to use them, how to design and maintain them, and how to budget for them. Setting out to address that challenge,

Pollutant Trading to Improve Riparian Habitats

Pollutant Trading to Improve Riparian Habitats

Rahr Malting Co., located in Shakopee, MN, is one of the largest malt producers in the United States. In 1997, Rahr requested permission to build its own wastewater treatment plant and withdraw from the regional sewer system. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) denied this request because a total maximum

Quantifying Increases in Stream Power and Energy

Watershed scientists use various methods to quantify urban impacts on stream channels. These methods, when focused specifically on the physical changes that occur in channels, include the following measurements: cross-section geometry change over time, bedload movement and sediment deposition at the reach scale, and shear stress and tractive force. One

Stormwater Treatment Train

Stormwater Treatment Train

When Jean Baptiste Point du Sable built his farm as the first white settler of Chicago, IL, he never knew the Des Plaines River was a river. Because, back then, in the 1780s, it really wasn’t. He would have thought of it as a swamp. The interplay of landscape and

Enter Your Log In Credentials
×