Tag: cogen plant

Cogen, cogeneration or combined heat and power (CHP) is the use of a heat engine[1] or power station to generate electricity and useful heat at the same time. Trigeneration or combined cooling, heat and power (CCHP) refers to the simultaneous generation of electricity and useful heating and cooling from the combustion of a fuel or a solar heat collector.

Cogeneration Is Talking Trash

Cogeneration Is Talking Trash

Back in the 1880s, the first electric generators were powered by steam engines. The process was quite inefficient compared to today’s standards, but one technique was employed back then: the basis for modern combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The excess waste steam was harvested for process use or to

Cogeneration Is Talking Trash

Cogeneration Is Talking Trash

Back in the 1880s, the first electric generators were powered by steam engines. The process was quite inefficient compared to today’s standards, but one technique was employed back then: That was the basis for modern combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The excess waste steam was harvested for process use

Key Component

Key Component

There’s no need to belabor the point that distributed energy offers substantial gains to energy efficiency. But for distributed energy installations, that genset and heat capture hardware is just the beginning of the story, as well as the beginning of a site’s efficiency gains. The ideal onsite power project wrings

How About Onsite Power for Data Centers? Answer: Still a Tough Fuel Market

With energy consumption exploding exponentially—too fast for the power generation industry to keep pace—adding onsite generation would make natural sense. But so far, the obvious seems to be getting virtually no traction.

The experience of one notable high-efficiency combined cooling heating, and power (CCHP) plant perhaps gives a clue as to

Pay the Customer?!

If the greatest appeal of distributed energy (DE) ownership is the prospect of freedom from utility rates, the drawbacks are of a similar kind. First comes the expense and hassle of running what is, in effect, a personal onsite utility. Next are the vagaries of fuel costs, which can swing

Saving Digital Power

Saving Digital Power

Two years ago, a report by the EPA on data center energy use was scathing. In 133 pages, it detailed-often with a note of alarm-foreseeable trends in the nation’s energy-gobbling data centers, and the future was not bright. In response to the EPA’s “call to arms,” all manner of human

Taking Control

“Diesel” conjures to mind the rumble of high-power-density engines that can do the job. Unfortunately, until a few years ago, you probably also winced your nostrils at soot-puffing truck tailpipes, toxic with the scent of that black hydrocarbon combustion. But, beginning back in 1998, these unpleasant connotations began slowly to

Data Centers and DG

Data Centers and DG

Address one environmental challenge and sometimes another materializes. The e-communications revolution that has occurred over the past decade-plus has saved innumerable trees and reduced burdens on landfills and recycling facilities, in addition to exponentially improving the efficiency of information flow. But as technology applications such as Web hosting, financial transactions,

Recovering Nicely

Recovering Nicely

With its 20-plus buildings spanning two city blocks, the Montefiore Medical Center (MMC) in the Bronx, NY, has stood as a neighborhood landmark for 124 years. And with steep costs for power in a city with straining electrical circuits, any multi-megawatt user is a ripe candidate for self-generation. Thus, in

Working Ahead of the Curve

The University of New Hampshire’s (UNH) approach to addressing its growing campus energy demands was indeed worthy of a large public research institution. Prior to issuing a request for quotes, the university commissioned a comprehensive study of the campus’ energy requirements. The resulting master plan served as a basis for

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