Tag: cogeneration system

Cogeneration or combined heat and power (CHP) is the use of a heat engine or power station to generate electricity and useful heat at the same time. Trigeneration or combined cooling, heat and power (CCHP) refers to the simultaneous generation of electricity and useful heating and cooling from the combustion of a fuel or a solar heat collector.

A Growing Trend

A Growing Trend

Cogeneration systems, also known as combined heat and power, have traditionally been installed by larger industrial users with high steam and power demands and by smaller, institutional users such as universities and hospitals. Since the early 2000s, smaller industrial and commercial companies have discovered cogeneration utilizing natural gas-fired reciprocating engines,

Making Power Multitask With CHP/CCHP

Making Power Multitask With CHP/CCHP

Cogeneration, or combined heat and power (CHP), uses a heat engine or power station to generate electricity and heat for onsite uses. Trigeneration, or combined cooling, heat, and power (CCHP), is the simultaneous generation of electricity and useful heating and cooling as a result of the combustion of fuel or

Facility Focus: Critical Solutions for Clinical Applications

Facility Focus: Critical Solutions for Clinical Applications

Increasing cost pressures on hospitals due to impacts of health care reform on reimbursements appear to be impacting their energy sources, according to some industry experts. Changes in the economic model and ever-growing demand for reliability and lower emissions mean that distributed generation has a bright future in this space.

Guest Commentary: Combined Heat and Power

Guest Commentary: Combined Heat and Power

There are thousands of reported power outages each year. The largest cause of these interruptions is severe weather. Manufacturers need to determine how long they can go without production or supply basic functions like heating and cooling, or other essential services when the next big storm hits. When power delivery failure

Turbines and Non-Traditional Fuels

Turbines and Non-Traditional Fuels

In recent years, turbine manufacturers have been taking a number of steps to make their equipment more environmentally friendly in terms of improved efficiency and performance, reduced emissions, and such. However, what is even bigger news is how turbines are being used as parts of larger renewable and environment-conscious projects.

Cogeneration Is Talking Trash

Cogeneration Is Talking Trash

Back in the 1880s, the first electric generators were powered by steam engines. The process was quite inefficient compared to today’s standards, but one technique was employed back then: the basis for modern combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The excess waste steam was harvested for process use or to

Cogeneration Is Talking Trash

Cogeneration Is Talking Trash

Back in the 1880s, the first electric generators were powered by steam engines. The process was quite inefficient compared to today’s standards, but one technique was employed back then: That was the basis for modern combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The excess waste steam was harvested for process use

Options for Emissions, Noise, and Fuel Handling

Options for Emissions, Noise, and Fuel Handling

Emissions
Onsite energy continues to prove itself as an economical and sustainable solution for businesses and institutions. But as it grows in popularity, the marketplace and government agencies are adding regulations for noise, emissions, and fuel handling. In the past such requirements would have slowed progress, but today there’s good news

It’s a “Cogenerational” Thing

It’s a “Cogenerational” Thing

Back in the 1880s, the first electric generators were powered by steam engines. The process was quite inefficient compared to today’s standards, but one technique was employed back then that continues to be the basis for modern combined heat and power (CHP) generation: The excess waste steam was harvested for

Options for Emissions, Noise, and Fuel Handling

Options for Emissions, Noise, and Fuel Handling

Emissions Onsite energy continues to prove itself as an economical and sustainable solution for businesses and institutions. But as it grows in popularity, the marketplace and government agencies are adding regulations for noise, emissions, and fuel handling. In the past such requirements would have slowed progress, but today there’s good

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