Tag: electrical demand

Defining Our Terms. kW–Rate of using electricity (Demand). Example: Ten 100-watt lamps consume electricity at the rate of 1,000 watts, or 1 kilowatt, or 1 kilowatt-hour per hour. kWh–Electrical energy actually used (Energy). Example: Ten 100-watt lamps, when on for one hour, consume 1 kilo- watt-hour (kWh).

Integrating Demand Reduction With Storage and Renewables

Integrating Demand Reduction With Storage and Renewables

The energy storage business is hot these days. It has become the most talked-about trend in the retail energy business in the past three years with large companies offering new products, and startups introducing newly designed energy storage, software, and hardware packages.

The popularity of energy storage is driven by the rapid

Renewable Energy for Onsite Power Generation

Renewable Energy for Onsite Power Generation

Although every situation is unique, and it’s difficult to generalize, Barry Worthington, executive director of the US Energy Association (USEA) in Washington, DC, says progress in renewable energy over the last 10 years has been phenomenal as systems become more efficient. Nevertheless, use of renewable energy for onsite power generation

Sprig Electric Pairs Tesla Powerpack with PV System

Sprig Electric Pairs Tesla Powerpack with PV System

Sprig Electric installed one of the nation’s first Tesla Powerpack commercial battery systems, used in conjunction with rooftop solar panels to reduce energy costs at Sprig Electric headquarters in San Jose, Calif.

Sprig Electric is one of the first electrical contractors in the U.S. to pair Tesla’s Powerpack battery with

Cogeneration Is Talking Trash

Cogeneration Is Talking Trash

Back in the 1880s, the first electric generators were powered by steam engines. The process was quite inefficient compared to today’s standards, but one technique was employed back then: the basis for modern combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The excess waste steam was harvested for process use or to

Cogeneration Is Talking Trash

Cogeneration Is Talking Trash

Back in the 1880s, the first electric generators were powered by steam engines. The process was quite inefficient compared to today’s standards, but one technique was employed back then: That was the basis for modern combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The excess waste steam was harvested for process use

Decommissioning Coal: Not So Cut and Dry

Decommissioning Coal: Not So Cut and Dry

When Roger Miller wrote his 1966 single, “You Can’t Rollerskate in a Buffalo Herd,” he left a verse out. “You can’t baseload with renewable power” would fit well with all the other silly, impossible scenarios, like driving around with a tiger in your car or fishing in a watermelon patch.

It’s a “Cogenerational” Thing

It’s a “Cogenerational” Thing

Back in the 1880s, the first electric generators were powered by steam engines. The process was quite inefficient compared to today’s standards, but one technique was employed back then that continues to be the basis for modern combined heat and power (CHP) generation: The excess waste steam was harvested for

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