Tag: electrical grid

An electrical grid is an interconnected network for delivering electricity from suppliers to consumers. It consists of generating stations that produce electrical power, high-voltage transmission lines that carry power from distant sources to demand centers, and distribution lines that connect individual customers.

Fuel Cells and Energy Sustainability

Fuel Cells and Energy Sustainability

Given that energy sustainability and energy economics are top-of-mind among business leaders, politicians, and the public these days, hydrogen fuel cells may be viewed as a savior technology. If that statement seems hyperbolic, there is plenty of statistical evidence to support the growth of fuel cell use for both stationary

Reader Profile: Manish Mohanpurkar

Reader Profile: Manish Mohanpurkar

Manish Mohanpurkar, a power and energy systems engineer at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), views the nation’s electrical grid as a “multi-faceted and multi-dimensional system that is very complex to understand and interpret.” But he welcomes the challenge and spends his days constructing various scenarios using the Real-Time Power and Energy Systems

Renewable Energy for Onsite Power Generation

Renewable Energy for Onsite Power Generation

Although every situation is unique, and it’s difficult to generalize, Barry Worthington, executive director of the US Energy Association (USEA) in Washington, DC, says progress in renewable energy over the last 10 years has been phenomenal as systems become more efficient. Nevertheless, use of renewable energy for onsite power generation

Connectivity And Resilience

Connectivity And Resilience

The great northeast power blackout of 2003 was a reminder that reliance on large grids has widespread implications. The power outage—lasting several days in some areas—affected millions in the US and Canada. Nearly a decade later, Hurricane Sandy left the area without power for weeks. Many in the energy industry

Switchgear Arc Protection and Resistance

Switchgear Arc Protection and Resistance

Arc flash events in electrical distribution systems can be devastating, costing up to $15 million in direct damages and indirect costs, such as health care, workers compensation, and others (EPRI 1999). An arc flash can generate temperatures over 35,000°F and projectile-producing pressures equivalent to 700 miles per hour, and is

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