Tag: energy certificates

Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs), also known as Green tags, Renewable Energy Credits, Renewable Electricity Certificates, or Tradable Renewable Certificates (TRCs), are tradable, non-tangible energy commodities in the United States that represent proof that 1 megawatt-hour (MWh) of electricity was generated from an eligible renewable energy resource (renewable electricity). Solar renewable energy certificates (SRECs) are RECs that are specifically generated by solar energy.

Curb Appeal Leans Green at the Mall

Curb Appeal Leans Green at the Mall

Retail landlords—like their shoppers—love a good deal. And lately, those good deals are green: environmentally speaking, and for the bottom line. Capital investments that support retailer mandates for environmental sustainability are paying off, big time.

Cogeneration Is Talking Trash

Cogeneration Is Talking Trash

Back in the 1880s, the first electric generators were powered by steam engines. The process was quite inefficient compared to today’s standards, but one technique was employed back then: the basis for modern combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The excess waste steam was harvested for process use or to

Handling the Heat With CHP

Handling the Heat With CHP

There is a renewed emphasis in the distributed generation marketplace for solutions such as Combined Heating and Power (CHP) and cogeneration, with shale gas being one of the primary drivers, notes Clark Wiedetz, director of alternative and renewable energy for the Building Technologies Division of Siemens.

Handling the Heat With CHP

Handling the Heat With CHP

There is a renewed emphasis in the distributed generation marketplace for solutions such as Combined Heating and Power (CHP) and cogeneration, with shale gas being one of the primary drivers, notes Clark Wiedetz, director of alternative and renewable energy for the Building Technologies Division of Siemens. Michael Perna, vice president

Cogeneration Is Talking Trash

Cogeneration Is Talking Trash

Back in the 1880s, the first electric generators were powered by steam engines. The process was quite inefficient compared to today’s standards, but one technique was employed back then: That was the basis for modern combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The excess waste steam was harvested for process use

Getting the Gas Out

Getting the Gas Out

Joel Zylstra, president of Granger Energy, calls landfill-gas-to-energy projects “one of the bright shining stars of the waste industry. “In our view, the landfill can be a very efficient producer of a renewable energy source,” says Zylstra. “With minimal processing and nature doing its own thing, we’ve got an extractable

Market Realities

Market Realities

These days, “fracking” is almost a household word. Half a dozen years ago few had even heard of this rupturous, explosive method for fuel extraction. Back then, the energy mantra was “go green”. People worried about peak oil; now we wonder if the bounteous fuel output is harming aquifers. Today,

Landfills As Energy Farms

Landfills As Energy Farms

Not long ago they were open trash pits that emitted unpleasant odors while devouring the financial resources of their owners. But today, it’s as if the princess of sustainability came along and kissed the frog of landfills, and now the frog generates profits rather than odors. But don’t blame the

The Clean Energy Landscape

The Clean Energy Landscape

EPA’s recent list of top 50 organizations in the Green Power Partnership have purchased more than 12 billion kWh of green power annually, equivalent to avoiding the carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from the electricity use of more than one million average American homes. They’re using renewable power sources

Built-in Efficiency

Built-in Efficiency

Building envelopes are encompassing an increasing use of renewables as interdisciplinary cooperation between architects and engineers, and an emerging preference for outcome-based designs is ramping up. Addressing renewables and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification, Joe Murray, a principle design architect with IDC Architects, a wholly owned subsidiary

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