Tag: erosion and sedimentation control

The most effective known method for erosion prevention is to increase vegetative cover on the land, which helps prevent both wind and water erosion.[80] Terracing is an extremely effective means of erosion control, which has been practiced for thousands of years by people all over the world.[81] Windbreaks (also called shelterbelts) are rows of trees and shrubs that are planted along the edges of agricultural fields, to shield the fields against winds. In addition to significantly reducing wind erosion, windbreaks provide many other benefits such as improved microclimates for crops (which are sheltered from the dehydrating and otherwise damaging effects of wind), habitat for beneficial bird species,[83] carbon sequestration,[84] and aesthetic improvements to the agricultural landscape. Traditional planting methods, such as mixed-cropping (instead of monocropping) and crop rotation have also been shown to significantly reduce erosion rates

Cost-Effective Erosion Control With Blankets and Mats – Part 1

Cost-Effective Erosion Control With Blankets and Mats – Part 1

For temporary slope protection or long-term channel reinforcement, erosion control blankets and turf reinforcement mats are finding new uses in diverse environments.

Today’s tough federal and state environmental laws force both public and private developers to be much more careful in developing a construction site than in the past. National Pollutant

Reader Profile: Ted Sherrod

Reader Profile: Ted Sherrod

Ted Sherrod, P.E., CPESC, CPSWQ, has worked on both sides of the fence in erosion control and stormwater efforts for the public and the private sectors. Until December 2010, Sherrod had spent 30 years as a state roadside environmental field operations engineer with the North Carolina Department of Transportation, amassing

Project Profile: Colleges Bring Innovation to Fort Benning

Project Profile: Colleges Bring Innovation to Fort Benning

Recently the US Army, in an effort to consolidate resources, moved the United States Army Armor School to Fort Benning, GA. The maneuvering of its numerous tracked vehicles, which can weigh as much as 75 tons each, disturbs large areas of vegetation, loosening the soil and exposing it to erosion

Local Universities Bring Innovation to Fort Benning

Local Universities Bring Innovation to Fort Benning

Recently the US Army, in an effort to consolidate resources, moved the United States Army Armor School to Fort Benning, GA. The maneuvering of its numerous tracked vehicles, which weigh as much as 75 tons each, disturbs large areas of vegetation, loosens the soil, and exposes it to erosion with

Going to Seed

Going to Seed

On September 11, 2001, Flight 93 went down in rural Shanksville, PA, after its passengers fought back against the terrorist hijackers. Ten years later, on September 11, 2011, a memorial site was dedicated. Hilltop Seeds, of Shippenville, PA, was the subcontractor selected to acquire the seeds and to do the

Keeping the Dirt Where It Belongs

Consider the costly consequences at a 50-acre construction site for a commercial development in the Portland, OR metropolitan area this past fall, where attempts to protect bare slopes from the impact of winter rains and runoff was done the wrong way—using inappropriate and, in one situation, incorrectly installed best management

Evolution of Stormwater Management

This article is the final installment of a three-part series addressing the current state of stormwater management in the Atlanta area. Part 1 focused on stormwater management issues; part 2 focused on redevelopment and professional certification; and part 3 looks at the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and its implications for

Successful Implementation of Riparian Buffer Programs

Almost every article and paper one reads on riparian buffers starts with the most basic definitions. To those who are already familiar with the concept of riparian buffers or are researching them, this constant reiteration of definitions and introductions might seem repetitive and unnecessary. However, upon careful consideration, one realizes

Erosion Control By Design

Erosion control is an important consideration on any construction project. Seldom, though, is control of erosion the overriding consideration on a project. Such was the case on the Vitale Fly Ash Consolidation and Habitat Restoration Project in Beverly and Wenham, MA. Control of erosion and dust was a driving force

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