Tag: erosion

College Stormwater Programs

College Stormwater Programs

Not too long ago, there were only two colleges in the United States where one could learn about stormwater management, notes Brant Keller, public works director for Griffin, GA.

Porous Pavers: Improving Water Quality

Porous Pavers: Improving Water Quality

Permeable pavement is taking center stage now as erosion control and stormwater green infrastructure projects aim to reduce runoff and improve water quality.

Stopping Nonpoint-Source Pollution
In Columbia, MO, the Public Works Department received a Clean Water Act 319 grant for stormwater improvements to reduce nonpoint-source pollution into the creeks and streams.

Case Studies in Tube-Based Sediment Control

Case Studies in Tube-Based Sediment Control

With traditional sediment control devices like straw wattles and silt fence, a drop-and-go installation style could be disastrous. Proper trenching, staking, and preparation of the BMP-soil interface means the difference between success and failure, which has led many manufacturers of sediment control products to design the next generation of more

Measuring Earthwork Volumes

Formulas and methods for determining the volumes and areas of regular shapes and surfaces go back at least as far as ancient Greece. Pythagoras and other mathematicians determined the formulas that are still used to calculate the volumes of spheres and pyramids, as well as the areas of curve conic

Embracing Invasive Species

Embracing Invasive Species

We’ve talked a lot on this website and in Erosion Control magazine about invasive species, from kudzu to the salt cedar beetle. Sometimes non-native species are introduced into an ecosystem deliberately: as ornamental plants, or vegetation used to shore up eroding hillsides, or animals and insects used as biological controls

The Benefits of Engineered Soils

The Benefits of Engineered Soils

Engineered soil: it sounds like a new concept, but one historical record notes it is more than 1,000 years old. In the sixth century AD, a group of ascetic monks left the lush, green mainland of Ireland seeking a new, remote environment to practice their dedication and humility. Braving the

Governor Brown Signs Bill to Preserve the Sea Level Rise Database

Governor Brown Signs Bill to Preserve the Sea Level Rise Database

Governor Brown recently signed a bill by Assemblymember Berman (D-Palo Alto) that reaffirms California’s commitment to preparing for and adapting to sea level rise. Assembly Bill 184 extends the Planning for Sea Level Rise Database to January 1, 2023.

“Two-thirds of Californians inhabit coastal regions, which means sea level

Making Dozers More Versitile

Making Dozers More Versitile

Kansas farmer James Cummings and draftsman J. Earl McLeod designed the first bulldozer in 1923. When they filed for a US patent, they described it as an “attachment for tractors” used to plow fields. Large, powerful, and on tracks that gave it mobility through rugged terrain and grip in muddy

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