Tag: gabions

A gabion (from Italian gabbione meaning “big cage”; from Italian gabbia and Latin cavea meaning “cage”) is a cage, cylinder, or box filled with rocks, concrete, or sometimes sand and soil for use in civil engineering, road building, military applications and landscaping.
For erosion control, caged riprap is used. For dams or in foundation construction, cylindrical metal structures are used.

Saving Streams

Saving Streams

As streambanks erode over time, erosion control specialists are called in to mitigate the problem with approaches that may include hard armor or a softer approach, such as bioengineering. The long-term goal—as well as costs, function, permeability, flexibility, and aesthetics—often dictate the approach.

Protecting Coral in Guánica Bay
One project in Puerto

Saving Streams

Saving Streams

As streambanks erode over time, erosion control specialists are called in to mitigate the problem with approaches that may include hard armor or a softer approach, such as bioengineering. The long-term goal—as well as costs, function, permeability, flexibility, and aesthetics—often dictate the approach.

Protecting Coral in Guánica Bay
One project in Puerto

Channel Stabilization and Repair

Channel Stabilization and Repair

The case studies in this article focus on channel stabilization and erosion control along streambanks and other waterways. Channel stabilization and repair usually calls for the use of a channel lining. These safeguards fall into two major categories—soft and hard.

Soft armor, also referred to as flexible or green techniques, consist

The Evolution of Coastal Erosion Control Technology – Part 2

The Evolution of Coastal Erosion Control Technology – Part 2

Just as dune creation and restoration mimics a natural process, the same can be said for the creation of artificial reefs. Reefs, which have been labeled the rainforests of the sea, perform a particularly important coastal erosion control function, acting as natural breakwaters. Protecting shorelines from wave action, and in

Protection Without Breaking the Bank

Protection Without Breaking the Bank

A lengthy stretch of creek in the Dallas-Ft. Worth area had suffered significant erosion damage over the course of many years. In addition, because this creek is in a low-lying area, at the bottom of a valley, it was prone to repeated flooding.

Formidable Retaining Wall Blocks Replace Withered Sea Walls

Formidable Retaining Wall Blocks Replace Withered Sea Walls

In Part 2 of a 4-part series on retaining wall designs, author Carol Brzozowski illustrates two examples where encroaching wave erosion threatens two families’ cherished shoreline residences. In each, Brzozowski describes how site-specific projects can incorporate the effectiveness of large retaining wall blocks as they are linked naturally into shoreline-shaped

Formidable Retaining Wall Blocks Replace Withered Sea Walls

Formidable Retaining Wall Blocks Replace Withered Sea Walls

In Part Two of a four-part series on retaining wall designs, author Carol Brzozowski illustrates two examples where encroaching wave erosion threatens two families’ cherished shoreline residences. In each, Brzozowski describes how site-specific projects can incorporate the effectiveness of large retaining wall blocks as they are linked naturally into shoreline-shaped

A Gamut of Retaining Walls

A Gamut of Retaining Walls

These days, retaining walls are not only doing the job of keeping water and soil at bay and shoring up slopes and hillsides, but also are providing aesthetic value while doing so. Erosion control specialists throughout North America are choosing walls that serve multiple purposes and can be installed quickly.

Protection Without Breaking the Bank

Protection Without Breaking the Bank

A lengthy stretch of creek in the Dallas-Ft. Worth area had suffered significant erosion damage over the course of many years. In addition, because this creek is in a low-lying area, at the bottom of a valley, it was prone to repeated flooding. “To make matters worse, parking lots are

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