Tag: gis system

A geographic information system or geographical information system (GIS) is a system designed to capture, store, manipulate, analyze, manage, and present all types of spatial or geographical data. The acronym GIS is sometimes used for geographic information science (GIScience) to refer to the academic discipline that studies geographic information systems and is a large domain within the broader academic discipline of Geoinformatics. What goes beyond a GIS is a spatial data infrastructure, a concept that has no such restrictive boundaries.

Keeping the Plant Running

Keeping the Plant Running

Disasters such as Superstorm Sandy and Hurricane Katrina have taught water utilities that emergency planning and well-maintained backup systems are critical to limiting the devastating impact of plant failures. But what are the components of a good plan andmaintenance program? We posed that question to water system managers who survived

Integrating GIS and Hydraulic Modeling

Integrating GIS and Hydraulic Modeling

Does it make sense for water utilities to integrate GIS (geographic information system) technology with hydraulic modeling? In most cases, the answer is yes. In the past, hydraulic models were reconstructed every few years, a necessary but time-consuming process. However, as hydraulic models have increased in complexity and need to

AMI + GIS = Multiple Benefits

AMI + GIS = Multiple Benefits

Under what circumstances does it make sense for water utilities to integrate GIS and Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI)? “Utilities have been integrating GIS with AMI and AMR [automatic meter reading] for years,” says Joe Ball, director of marketing, Water North America for Itron. “Many utilities used their AMI/AMR deployments as

Utilities and Water Customers Get Help With Data Management

Utilities and Water Customers Get Help With Data Management

Siemens
Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) and data management software are being increasingly adopted by water utilities to address issues such as water conservation, system maintenance, and future water infrastructure planning.

According to information from Siemens, today’s aging water infrastructure requires $1 trillion in improvements to meet current design standards. “The infeasibility of

Integrating GIS and Hydraulic Modeling

Integrating GIS and Hydraulic Modeling

Does it make sense for water utilities to integrate GIS (geographic information system) technology with hydraulic modeling? In most cases, the answer is yes.

In the past, hydraulic models were reconstructed every few years, a necessary but time-consuming process. However, as hydraulic models have increased in complexity and need to be

Utilities and Water Customers Get Help With Data Management

Utilities and Water Customers Get Help With Data Management

Siemens Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) and data management software are being increasingly adopted by water utilities to address issues such as water conservation, system maintenance, and future water infrastructure planning. According to information from Siemens, today’s aging water infrastructure requires $1 trillion in improvements to meet current design standards. “The

Overcoming the Barriers to Financing AMI

Overcoming the Barriers to Financing AMI

There are generally four barriers when it comes to financing an Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) system as part of an overall smart water technology approach: 1. A lack of understanding about the business case 2. A lack of funding 3. A lack of political support 4. Disparate products and solutions

Pipes: Locate and Evaluate

By Lyn Corum Water agencies are growing ever more sophisticated in their adoption of new technologies and information systems to digitally map their piping infrastructures, initiate inspection and replacement schedules, and maintain them through a sophisticated geographic information system, or GIS. Many of the water agencies are relying on the

Energy Management: Power System Automation

For more than two decades, electric power system automation has been undergoing a slow but steady transformation. In the 1980s and 1990s, the most significant issues were rooted in technology changes, such as the transformation from electromechanical to digital, from mini-computers to workstations, and from workstations to PCs. New technology

Connected and Safe, Above and Below

The construction industry is pulling in data display devices as big as notebooks and as small as cell phones, and using them to become more efficient on the job.

With ruggedized notebooks like Panasonic Toughbook 30 Plus and Dell Latitude XFR, among others, a contractor can bring the office to the

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