Tag: industrial stormwater

Protecting Puget Sound

Protecting Puget Sound

A common purpose runs through many, likely most, stormwater projects in the greater Seattle area and other western Washington cities, certainly in the projects profiled in this story.

StormCon Program

StormCon Program

StormCon 2017, the Surface Water Quality Conference & Expo, will take place August 27–31 in Bellevue, WA, at the Meydenbauer Convention Center and Hyatt Regency Hotel. The conference features more than 130 presentations in six conference tracks, plus panel discussions and a tour of local stormwater facilities.
The schedule of presentations

Case Study: Industrial Stormwater Treatment at the Port of Tacoma

Case Study: Industrial Stormwater Treatment at the Port of Tacoma

Background

Washington State has some of the most stringent industrial stormwater treatment standards in the United States with exceptionally low benchmark requirements for zinc, copper, and turbidity, also known as total suspended solids (TSS) or sediment.

Within the Port of Tacoma there are three industrial sites that were exceeding their benchmarks

Here We Go Again—Fees and Taxes

Here We Go Again—Fees and Taxes

By some estimates, more than 1,400 stormwater utilities now exist in the US, but each time a community attempts to set one up, it’s a new process all over again—introducing residents and potential ratepayers to the concept, enlisting the support of elected officials, setting up a rate structure. And each

George Washington Argued Here

George Washington Argued Here

We’ve seen them often enough in other parts of the country, and now one is flaring up on the Potomac River: a battle over water rights. The origins of this one go back almost four centuries and involve an agreement negotiated in 1785 by George Washington years before he became

“Mildly Radioactive”

“Mildly Radioactive”

Those of us concerned with surface water quality generally keep a wary eye on the amount of nutrients entering our lakes and rivers. Nitrogen and phosphorus from fertilizers—much of it from agricultural lands, some from urban stormwater runoff—are a big contributor to algae blooms and dead zones, and in high

102 Million Trees Gone

102 Million Trees Gone

The trees are dying.

We’ve known it for a while; in California’s forests, because of the ongoing drought, trees are dying by the millions. What wasn’t clear was the scale at which it’s happening. The latest aerial survey from the US Forest Service shows that the state has about 102

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