Tag: landfills

A landfill site is a site for the disposal of waste materials by burial and is the oldest form of waste treatment. Historically, landfills have been the most common method of organised waste disposal and remain so in many places around the world.

Tree Mortality: California’s Wood Waste Explosion

Tree Mortality: California’s Wood Waste Explosion

The Western slope of California’s Sierra Nevada mountain range is known worldwide—famous for the 49er Gold Rush, Yosemite National Park, the world’s largest trees (Giant Sequoias), and Mount Whitney, the tallest mountain in the continental United States. But it is also—perhaps less famously—home to California’s fastest-growing wastestream.

No, we’re not talking

MIDLAND, Mich. – July 11, 2017 – The Dow Chemical Company (NYSE: DOW) announced today it has teamed up with national nonprofit, Keep America Beautiful, to award two $50,000 grants for organizations to establish Hefty® EnergyBag™ programs in their communities. The program is an innovative approach to diverting traditionally non-recycled

Reader  Profile: Christina Hanson

Reader Profile: Christina Hanson

Christina Hanson, senior planner with the environmental engineering division for the County of Placer, CA, is described by coworkers as “dedicated and articulate.” In turn, she says she is proud to be part of a team providing residential and commercial garbage collection services to more than 39,000 customers covering about

Guest  Editorial: The World Is Coming to Us

Guest Editorial: The World Is Coming to Us

“I am from Iowa.”

Once, I drew on that sense of place and a niece’s question about why she should care about the world as a starting point to try to explain the global interconnections of recycling. I worked to prevent and clean up illegal dumpsites in woods and streams near

Landfill Managers Notebook: Tree Mortality: California’s Wood Waste Explosion

Landfill Managers Notebook: Tree Mortality: California’s Wood Waste Explosion

The Western slope of California’s Sierra Nevada mountain range is known worldwide—famous for the 49er Gold Rush, Yosemite National Park, the world’s largest trees (Giant Sequoias), and Mount Whitney, the tallest mountain in the continental United States. But it is also—perhaps less famously—home to California’s fastest-growing wastestream.

No, we’re not talking

SWANA News

SWANA News

International Solid Waste Association’s World Congress is co-locating with the Solid Waste Association of North America’s WASTECON 2017 in Baltimore, Maryland, USA this September.

These international events will feature topics such as climate change, resource management, marine litter, energy recovery, and more, through technical sessions, facility tours, exhibits and global networking

What’s That Smell?

What’s That Smell?

In many ways, material recovery facilities (MRFs) are harsher work environments than landfill working faces. During both operations, the protection of human health and the environment are primary concerns. While not exposed to the elements, the management of waste in a confined building has its own hazards. Enclosed facilities that

New Converts to Compost and Kilowatts

New Converts to Compost and Kilowatts

In 1915, a tragic farm accident reported in The Fruit Grower and Farmer was a mere footnote of local news. Patients from the State Hospital in Athens, OH, whose job was “to tramp down the silage comprised of corn stalks and leaves” were found asphyxiated in a tower silo. The report says

The Landfill Manager’s Guide to the Airspace Balance Equation

The Landfill Manager’s Guide to the Airspace Balance Equation

For the savvy landfill manager, settlement is like money in the bank…only better.
Here is a real-life example: A municipal landfill—one of our long-time clients—had listed a new liner in next year’s budget. The amount? Three million dollars. So, what’s the deal? Does the typical landfill have massive airspace resources just

Large Carnivorous Birds

Large Carnivorous Birds

NOAA is predicting a larger-than-usual dead zone in the Chesapeake Bay this summer. The usual causes of these hypoxic areas are excess nutrients—nitrogen and phosphorus—in stormwater runoff, which lead to algae blooms that decompose and deplete oxygen levels, harming aquatic life and wreaking havoc with fisheries.

It’s not just the

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