Tag: LFG

The Landfill Manager’s Guide to the Airspace Balance Equation

The Landfill Manager’s Guide to the Airspace Balance Equation

For the savvy landfill manager, settlement is like money in the bank…only better.
Here is a real-life example: A municipal landfill—one of our long-time clients—had listed a new liner in next year’s budget. The amount? Three million dollars. So, what’s the deal? Does the typical landfill have massive airspace resources just

Landfill Odor Control

Landfill Odor Control

While perhaps the increased emphasis on separate collections of organic wastes such as food scraps and other green waste has contributed to more odors, the development of neighborhoods closer to what was once a remote MSW operation is the overriding factor, say industry observers. Marc L. Byers, owner of Byers

The Costs and Benefits of Anaerobic Digesters

The Costs and Benefits of Anaerobic Digesters

Anaerobic digesters are a mature, proven technology. They take sludge, manure, and other organic waste materials and produce methane (natural gas) fuel. Nobody questions their technological capabilities. However, the question remains as to their economic benefits. In terms of dollars and cents, how much economic sense do anaerobic digesters make?

Updated Version 3.2 of LMOP’s LFGcost-Web Model

Updated Version 3.2 of LMOP’s LFGcost-Web Model

The U.S. EPA Landfill Methane Outreach Program (LMOP) is pleased to announce an update of its Landfill Gas Energy Cost Model, LFGcost-Web.

LFGcost-Web, Version 3.2, replaces Version 3.1 (published in November 2016). Significant revisions between Version 3.2 and Version 3.1 of LFGcost-Web include:

Added ability to estimate job creation and regional

Landfill Gas Treatment Systems

Landfill Gas Treatment Systems

Prior to conversion, limited treatment is required for direct use of landfill gas (LFG) in boilers or engines. Primary treatment steps may include dehydration and filtration to reduce moisture and particulates, as well as hydrogen sulfide and/or volatile organic compound (VOC) removal.

Odorous Assault

Odorous Assault

While perhaps the increased emphasis on separate collections of organic wastes such as food scraps and other green waste has contributed to more odors, the development of neighborhoods closer to what was once a remote MSW operation is the overriding factor, say industry observers. Marc L. Byers, owner of Byers

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