Tag: live stakes

A “Live Stake” is a dormant cutting of red-osier dogwood (Cornus serecia), gray dogwood (Cornus racemosa), silky dogwood (Cornus amomum) or native willow (Salix sp.). The cutting is 3 feet long and is pushed into the soil or inserted into a predrilled hole 2 feet into the ground in April.

Erosion Control Methods for Steep Slopes

Erosion Control Methods for Steep Slopes

Huge projects like the widening of US 202 in Pennsylvania span several years and several seasons. Stormwater and erosion control is an important part of the planning process, and a variety of soil erosion control devices play a role. Changing topography and limited highway easements sometimes result in steep slopes

Saving Faces

Saving Faces

In most cases, it would be the rare day at work for employees to have to rappel down steep slopes to get to their job site. But that is exactly what Jerry Kallam, vice president of business and development at L&M Supply Co., encountered when he visited the Ecuador airport

Saving Faces

Saving Faces

Extreme Airport Construction In most cases, it would be the rare day at work for employees to have to rappel down steep slopes to get to their job site. But that is exactly what Jerry Kallam, vice president of business and development at L&M Supply Co., encountered when he visited

Getting Back to Nature

Getting Back to Nature

The goal of many revegetation projects is often almost heroic: to recreate a wetlands damaged by open-pit coal mining, a salt water marsh drained for farming, or a canyon eroded by wildfire and flood-all based on tiny native seeds. Often these sites require compost, fertilizer, and mulch. In addition to

Cleanup on Kelley Hill

Cleanup on Kelley Hill

A construction contractor that was demolishing some buildings on Fort Benning, GA, improperly dumped the demolition debris into a gully located at Kelley Hill rather than hauling it to an authorized landfill. Most of the debris had been covered with soil; however, some of it had been exposed by erosion

Armored Stability

Armored Stability

Gone are the days when cementing a stream was the only solution to a tough slope stabilization problem. Streams are systems, and the best ways to fight erosion on their slopes often involves multiple solutions, according to the US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station’s Environmental Impact Research Program

From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

Anyone who’s worked with a containerized plant has seen evidence of how strong plant roots can be. Adhering tightly to the soil, roots form a living net of fibers that often require a sharp knife, or ax, to rend. Of course, with any erosion control project, plant materials (especially those

A Tale of Two Hillsides

A Tale of Two Hillsides

These two slope stabilization projects had the same goals: to protect the slopes from water-related erosion with engineering techniques and materials that made them look natural and remain maintenance-free for the long term. But the similarities end there. One project restored a fragile stream and protects it from stormwater flow.

Full Coverage

Full Coverage

Heading down the rabbit hole into the wonderland of erosion control is a trip to an exotic world where blankets do not cover babies in cribs, mats are not found on tables, and inlets are not narrow blue expanses of water but, in fact, drains. Hills become slopes, rivers and

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