Tag: loamy soil

Loam is soil composed mostly of sand and silt, and a smaller amount of clay (about 40%-40%-20% concentration, respectively). These proportions can vary to a degree, however, and result in different types of loam soils: sandy loam, silty loam, clay loam, sandy clay loam, silty clay loam, and loam. In the USDA textural classification triangle, the only soil that is not predominantly sand, silt, nor clay is called “loam”. Loam soils generally contain more nutrients, moisture, and humus than sandy soils, have better drainage and infiltration of water and air than silty soils, and are easier to till than clay soils. The different types of loam soils each have slightly different characteristics, with some draining liquids more efficiently than others. For food production, a loam soil containing a small amount of organic material is considered ideal. The mineral in a loam soil ideally is about 40% sand, 40% silt and 20% clay by weight. The soil’s texture, especially its ability to retain nutrients and water are crucial.

The Real Dirt on the Jersey Shore

The Real Dirt on the Jersey Shore

Proprietors of summer rentals converge on city offices, seeking redress as scourges of jellyfish drift towards the beach, frightening vacationers from seaside resorts. Watermen stand by helplessly, witnessing a shocking decline in their catches in areas that, until recently, were teeming with shellfish. Homeowners recoil at the prospect of venturing

Balancing Act

Balancing Act

Revegetating an area is rarely achieved with seed alone. Climate, soil conditions, budget, and project deadlines are just a few considerations that contractors must initially make regarding mulch and soil amendment choice as they work to make the most of the seed they’ve selected. A requirement to use, native seed

Prepared for Class

Prepared for Class

For the town of Williamston, NC, graduation day holds special significance. For most seniors at Williamston High School, graduation means saying goodbye–not just to their alma mater, but to their hometown as well. Faced with a local economy buffeted by the vagaries of global agriculture markets, and beyond reach of

Putting Erosion Problems to Bed With Blankets

Water, water everywhere-not the best site on which to use water-based applications, such as hydroseeding. For slopes or areas where water is meant to run, such as drainage ditches or retaining ponds, a covering of erosion control blankets or turf reinforcement mats can solve many problems. Water can’t move them-indeed,

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