Tag: magnesium chloride

Magnesium chloride is the name for the chemical compound with the formula MgCl2 and its various hydrates MgCl2(H2O)x. These salts are typical ionic halides, being highly soluble in water. The hydrated magnesium chloride can be extracted from brine or sea water. In North America, magnesium chloride is produced primarily from Great Salt Lake brine.

Stalking the Fugitive

Stalking the Fugitive

Dust—it’s everywhere, and seems to accumulate literally from thin air. It seems harmless but it is anything but that. Dramatic photos that captured the devastation of the central plains Dust Bowl of the Great Depression are compelling evidence of how dry, vulnerable soil, transported by wind, transforms the landscape.

Salt: No Easy Answers

Salt: No Easy Answers

The issue of groundwater and surface water contamination resulting from road deicing salt use is one of contaminant mitigation, not best management practices (BMPs). Nothing can be done to remove salt and its compounds once they get into water supplies, so the management focus is on reducing or eliminating salt

Advances in Dust and Erosion Control Products

Advances in Dust and Erosion Control Products

Erosion and dust control are sensitive issues for public and commercial projects. Whether the concerns are related to health problems or to safety and quality of life, companies that create dust or cause soil erosion are held responsible—and liable—for activities that violate government regulations. However, there are many effective dust

Ruling Out Dust

Ruling Out Dust

Dust control is a sensitive issue for public and commercial projects. Whether the concerns are related to health problems or to safety and quality of life, companies that create dust or cause soil erosion are held responsible—and liable—for activities that violate government regulations.
However, there are many effective products and services
available

Ruling Out Dust

Ruling Out Dust

Dust control is a sensitive issue for public and commercial projects. Whether the concerns are related to health problems or to safety and quality of life, companies that create dust or cause soil erosion are held responsible-and liable-for activities that violate government regulations. However, there are many effective products and

Tamping It Down

Tamping It Down

A study done by the Washington State Department of Ecology in 1992 found an average dust emission rate of 1.2 tons per acre per month for active construction sites. Another study by the same agency listed earthmoving, traffic, and general disturbance as the major dust-generating factors in construction work. Dust-generating

Science on the Horizon

Science on the Horizon

When it comes to dust, the effects from the hand of nature may appear a bit more dramatic than those generated by the activities of humans. The catastrophic eruption of Mount Krakatoa in 1883 blasted an immeasurable quantity dust 4 miles into the atmosphere, where it persisted for up to

Breaking the Ice

Breaking the Ice

Experts agree that there are few alternatives to ordinary salt as a versatile, reliable, and economical aid to winter driving. First tested on roadways in New Hampshire in the 1940s, salt has amassed a stellar record for improving safety and cold-weather mobility. However, casual observation reveals that high concentrations of

The Right Solution to Cut the Dust

The Right Solution to Cut the Dust

Dust control is not an option. Today’s increasing regulatory, safety, and social awareness demands compliance. So whether it’s a one-day project or an ongoing operation, dust control is definitely part of the plan. Dust emissions-even for a short time-are never “OK,” but the duration of your project may affect how

Containing Dust

Containing Dust

Peter Candelaria says he’s very passionate about dust control. “People came to Arizona during the 1950s and 1960s because they had pulmonary issues, whether it was allergies, asthma, or sinus problems. They came here because we had clean air,” says Candelaria, who was born and raised in Arizona. But like

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