Tag: mass burn

Mass burn technology, the most common municipal solid waste-to-electricity technology, involves the combustion of unprocessed or minimally processed refuse. The major components of a mass burn facility include:
Refuse receiving, handling, and storage systems
The combustion and steam generation system (a boiler)
A flue gas cleaning system
The power generation equipment (steam turbine and generator)
A condenser cooling water system
A residue hauling and storage system
Incoming trucks deposit the refuse into pits, where cranes then mix the refuse and remove any bulky or large non-combustible items (such as large appliances). The refuse storage area is maintained under pressure less than atmospheric in order to prevent odors from escaping. The cranes move the refuse to the combustor charging hopper to feed the boiler.

How Can We Make Green Energy Save Some Green?

How Can We Make Green Energy Save Some Green?

As I announced in a previous blog, Forester Media is preparing to launch a new publication this Fall—Energy Storage Solutions—following the dramatic changes that are taking place in how energy is produced, collected, stored, transmitted, and used.

Yes, nuclear, coal, natural gas, diesel, and gasoline fueled power generation plants will be

Material Separation Practices/Equipment

Material Separation Practices/Equipment

Steven Viny, CEO of Envision Waste Services in Cleveland, OH, regards it as such: “We’re always going to need landfills. There’s a time and a place for a single-stream MRF [Material Recovery Facility]. There’s a time and a place for a waste-to-energy unit. There’s a time and a place for

Material Separation Practices/Equipment

Material Separation Practices/Equipment

Steven Viny, CEO of Envision Waste Services in Cleveland, OH, regards it as such: “We’re always going to need landfills. There’s a time and a place for a single-stream MRF [Material Recovery Facility]. There’s a time and a place for a waste-to-energy unit. There’s a time and a place for

Advances in Energy…From Waste

Advances in Energy…From Waste

Increasingly, as communities focus on sending less waste to landfills, waste reduction and recycling initiatives are implemented in conjunction with energy-from-waste (EfW) technologies to manage what remains post-recycling. The most prominent technologies for production of EfW are mass-burn combustion with energy recovery, gasification, pyrolysis, and anaerobic digestion. This article provides

New Waste Transfer Building Opens in Harrisburg

New Waste Transfer Building Opens in Harrisburg

LANCASTER, Pa. – The Lancaster County Solid Waste Management Authority (LCSWMA) just reached a major milestone in the transformation of the former Harrisburg incinerator site, with the opening of a new 29,800 square-foot facility at the Susquehanna Resource Management Complex (SRMC) in Harrisburg. The building adds transfer, maintenance, and administrative

Guest Editorial: Waste-to-Energy—The Lost Decades

Guest Editorial: Waste-to-Energy—The Lost Decades

It’s now 2015, two decades since a new waste-to-energy (WTE) facility was built and commissioned in the United States. (The last one was in Montgomery County, MD, in 1995.) This long period without new facility construction will come to an end in a few months when the West Palm Beach

Waste to Energy Plants on the Rise

Waste to Energy Plants on the Rise

While waste to energy (WTE) is the third-most-preferred municipal solid waste approach behind source reduction/reuse and recycling/composting, some 29 million tons of MSW—12% of total generated—were combusted for energy recovery in 2011, according to “Municipal Solid Waste in the US: Facts and Figures.” The Energy Recovery Council—a national trade organization

Energy From Waste

Energy From Waste

While waste to energy is the third-most-preferred municipal solid waste approach behind source reduction/reuse and recycling/composting, some 29 million tons of MSW—12% of total generated—were combusted for energy recovery in 2011, according to “Municipal Solid Waste in the US: Facts and Figures.” The Energy Recovery Council—a national trade organization representing

LCSWMA Launches New CNG Project

LCSWMA Launches New CNG Project

LANCASTER, Pa. – During a ceremony that included over 100 attendees from throughout the region, the Lancaster County Solid Waste Management Authority (LCSWMA) held a dedication and grand opening of its $4.8 million compressed natural gas (CNG) project. “This is a significant day for LCSWMA and Lancaster County,” says Jim

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