Tag: national pollutant discharge elimination system

The NPDES permits program is authorized by CWA section 402. The initial permits issued in the 1970s and early 1980s focused on POTWs and industrial wastewater—typically “process” wastewater and cooling water where applicable, and in some cases, industrial stormwater. The 1987 WQA expanded the program to cover stormwater discharges explicitly, both from municipal separate storm sewer systems (MS4) and industrial sources. The MS4 NPDES permits require regulated municipalities to use Best Management Practices to reduce pollutants to the “Maximum Extent Practicable.”

Editor’s Comments: The Learning Curve

Editor’s Comments: The Learning Curve

Welcome to our “back to school” issue. The first article covers, in part, the winners of EPA’s fifth annual Campus RainWorks Challenge. For those of you who aren’t familiar with it, it’s a design competition open to colleges and universities throughout the US that encourages teams of students to design

Reader Profile: James Spotts

Reader Profile: James Spotts

James W. Spotts’ vehicle license tag reads “Dr. Dirt.” It’s an apt description for his career as a soil scientist, which now focuses on his company, Southeast Environmental Consultants, in Atlanta, GA. The seeds were sown when, as a child in north Florida, Spotts dug a hole into sandy soil

US EPA and California Approve Permit for Point Loma Wastewater Facility

US EPA and California Approve Permit for Point Loma Wastewater Facility

Advanced treatment will reduce discharges to ocean, provide sustainable water source

The US Environmental Protection Agency and the San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board finalized a City of San Diego wastewater discharge permit to protect ocean water quality and increase water reuse. The Clean Water Act National Pollutant Discharge Elimination

A Five-Year Study of IDDE Data

A Five-Year Study of IDDE Data

Pierce County’s Surface Water Management (SWM) division is charged with maintaining both the natural surface water systems and the stormwater collection and conveyance infrastructure within its unincorporated 1,800-square-mile service area (population 380,000). These areas include an impressive variability in landscapes: from glacial streams of Mt. Rainier to fertile farmlands of

A Five-Year Study of IDDE Data

A Five-Year Study of IDDE Data

Pierce County’s Surface Water Management (SWM) division is charged with maintaining both the natural surface water systems and the stormwater collection and conveyance infrastructure within its unincorporated 1,800-square-mile service area (population 380,000). These areas include an impressive variability in landscapes: from glacial streams of Mt. Rainier to fertile farmlands of

Sand Filter Systems With Detention: A Perfect Solution

Sand Filter Systems With Detention: A Perfect Solution

For stormwater detention and filtration in small, highly impervious drainage areas, sand filter systems with detention may be the perfect solution. In urban areas, they may sometimes be the only solution. They’re appropriate for commercial, municipal, and industrial operations.

Editor’s Comments: Where Do We Go From Here?

Editor’s Comments: Where Do We Go From Here?

A little more than two years ago, I wrote an editorial for Stormwater—Erosion Control’s sister publication—about the agri­cultural exemption from many of our water-quality regulations. While urban areas and construction sites are subject to National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits and other requirements, agricultural operations have less oversight, and their

Regulating Animal Feeding Operations: A New Attempt

Regulating Animal Feeding Operations: A New Attempt

They say optimism is seeing the glass half full. They also say one definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result. You can decide for yourself whether 35 of the country’s environmental groups are optimistic or crazy, but they’re trying something that

An Approach for Communities to Assess Stormwater Application and Detention Requirements for Overall Watershed Health

An Approach for Communities to Assess Stormwater Application and Detention Requirements for Overall Watershed Health

Communities, especially those with limited resources, face many issues when trying to protect their local watersheds through the use of stormwater policies. Stormwater policies that are imposed on new development have the ability to enhance a community’s overall watershed health (Ferguson 1998). However, past requirements often relate only to large

How Trackout and Wheel-Washing Systems Can Improve Profitability

How Trackout and Wheel-Washing Systems Can Improve Profitability

Contractors who use trackout cleanup equipment such as automatic wheel-washing systems merely to comply with environmental site regulations may be taking the wrong approach. Plenty of reasons exist for “taking the high road” and adopting these systems—namely minimizing operating costs, which can allow for more competitive bidding, and maintaining a

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