Tag: riprap

Riprap, also known as rip rap, rip-rap, shot rock, rock armour or rubble, is rock or other material used to armor shorelines, streambeds, bridge abutments, pilings and other shoreline structures against scour and water or ice erosion. It is made from a variety of rock types, commonly granite or limestone, and occasionally concrete rubble from building and paving demolition. It can be used on any waterway or water containment where there is potential for water erosion.

Keeping Dirt Onsite

Keeping Dirt Onsite

The scope of work for BMP Contractors in ­Riverside, CA, has greatly expanded with new construction permit requirements, notes ­company president Doug Sadler.

Retaining Wall Project Profiles

Retaining Wall Project Profiles

Retaining walls have become so much a part of our environment that most people barely notice them. However, professionals realize how much they have changed over the years and what an asset they have become. The ability to provide strength and integrity makes some projects possible that once would have

Preventing Erosion with Riprap and Gabion Walls

Preventing Erosion with Riprap and Gabion Walls

Rocks probably were humans’ first construction materials, and they still may be one of our most important.

Loose, as riprap, or contained in gabion walls, they’re ideal for preventing erosion along water channels, ­rivers, creeks, lakes, and oceans.

Rock Solid

Rock Solid

Rocks probably were humans’ first construction materials, and they still may be one of our most important.

Loose, as riprap, or contained in gabion walls, they’re ideal for preventing erosion along water channels, ­rivers, creeks, lakes, and oceans.

Stabilizing Hillsides and Creek Bottoms

Stabilizing Hillsides and Creek Bottoms

The rolling landscape of Scott County, MN, is rural but not particularly remote. “That area is farm country, and the Minnesota River goes through the entire area. On the top of the bluffs it’s farmland, but at the river, the elevation drops about 200 feet in 800 feet,” says Paul

The Right Size for the Job

The Right Size for the Job

People often boast of the size, horsepower, and strength of the equipment they own and use. However, for many erosion control jobs, the right choice is compact equipment that has a smaller footprint. Compact excavators, track loaders, and skid steers are the best option for projects in limited space or

Stream Buffers 101

Stream Buffers 101

Stream buffers are natural areas adjacent to streams and waterways that remain free of ­devel­opment, con­struction, or other alterations and play an important role in maintaining predevelopment water quality. The riparian vegetation stabilizes stream channels, provides terrestrial and aquatic habitat, slows runoff rates, reduces runoff volume, and filters development runoff.

Back to Basics

Back to Basics

Imagine a stormwater management system that provides sedimentation, variable denitrification and oxygen saturation, evapotranspiration, volatilization, and infiltration. Is this the newest high-tech engineered stormwater treatment system? No, it’s the original green infrastructure: the stream channel. In suburban and rural communities in New England and many other parts of the country,

Stream Buffers

Stream Buffers

Stream buffers are natural areas adjacent to streams and waterways that remain free of ­devel­opment, con­struction, or other alterations and play an important role in maintaining predevelopment water quality. The riparian vegetation stabilizes stream channels, provides terrestrial and aquatic habitat, slows runoff rates, reduces runoff volume, and filters development runoff.

Working the Channels

Working the Channels

For erosion control specialists, channel stabilization can bring a host of challenges. Working around water means choosing solutions that will be durable and environmentally friendly at the same time. Approaches may include the combination of hard and soft armor or vegetative techniques.

Enter Your Log In Credentials
×