Tag: sediment control measures

A sediment control is a practice or device designed to keep eroded soil on a construction site, so that it does not wash off and cause water pollution to a nearby stream, river, lake, or sea. Sediment controls are usually employed together with erosion controls, which are designed to prevent or minimize erosion and thus reduce the need for sediment controls. Sediment controls are generally designed to be temporary measures, however, some can be used for storm water management purposes.

Minimizing Sediment Discharges From Landfill Projects

Minimizing Sediment Discharges From Landfill Projects

Removal of suspended particles in runoff happens when one of two conditions occurs: reduced flow velocities or filtered runoff. The former can occur by changing a slope gradient, increasing surface roughness, or containing runoff waters. The latter requires a medium through which runoff can flow to capture suspended particles. Both

More Trouble After the Fires

More Trouble After the Fires

“For days in 2012, we watched those white and gray clouds of smoke and wondered if we would lose our home, and now we dread seeing the dark rain clouds come up. Our town is still under threat because of floods that came after the fire,” says a resident of

The Natural Touch

The Natural Touch

Increasing federal, state, and local regulations require that erosion control work must be done in a way that protects the environment. Using erosion control products made of natural materials can help achieve that goal, as the following projects show. When Matt Kerkhof of Hoosier Aquatic Management first saw the 15-acre

Finding a Strategy for Sediment

Finding a Strategy for Sediment

Many things are dictating the choices of temporary sediment control these days: stormwater pollution prevention plan (SWPPP) compliance and other environmental concerns, product strength, ease of installation, productivity concerns, minimal maintenance, reduced labor costs, and other budgetary factors. While temporary sediment control may consist of a BMP used on a

Wildfire and Flood

Wildfire and Flood

On the heels of the budget request testimony of the US Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell to the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources in April, fires in southern California started blazing in May. The early arrival of fire season in the state-combined with the fact that state firefighters

A National Report Card for Streams

As stormwater professionals, much of our work is focused on local water bodies: how our programs are affecting, for better or worse, the nutrient levels in a local lake, or the number of days the local beach is closed because of high indicator bacteria counts. In areas that have total

Diagnosing the Nation’s Streams

Diagnosing the Nation’s Streams

In March, EPA released results of its National Rivers and Stream Assessment. In some ways it makes for depressing reading-it shows that more than half the streams in the US are in bad shape. But there are some encouraging bits hidden in the report, too, or at least indications that

The Myth of Barriers to Remove Sediment From Runoff Waters

The Myth of Barriers to Remove Sediment From Runoff Waters

Today, a multi-million-dollar industry provides a variety of products to meet EPA’s mandate of installing construction site best management practices (BMPs) to minimize pollutants in the discharge of runoff waters. On any construction site, one will find numerous barriers to perform this task, including silt fence, straw bale, fiber roll,

Illinois Contractor: It’s Gotten Easier

In Illinois, more recordkeeping regarding erosion and sediment control measures on construction sites has been required since -NPDES Phase II became effective in 2003. But that’s actually a good thing, according to Steven Phillips, principal/senior project manager for Lake County Grading Company in Libertyville, IL. Phillips reports that Lake County

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