Tag: sediment traps

Sediment traps are instruments used in oceanography to measure the quantity of sinking particulate organic (and inorganic) material in aquatic systems, usually oceans. This flux of material is the product of biological and ecological processes typically within the surface euphotic zone, and is of interest to scientists studying the role of the biological pump in the carbon cycle.

A Low-Cost Coring Platform

A Low-Cost Coring Platform

Soil erosion costs billions of dollars in lost ­agricultural productivity, property destruction, and water pollution each year in the US (USDA 1987). Displaced sediment also reduces channel and ­reservoir storage for flood control. Often, soil erosion is problematic in areas cleared of native ­vegetation for agriculture and development, including the

Minimizing Sediment Discharges From Landfill Projects

Minimizing Sediment Discharges From Landfill Projects

Removal of suspended particles in runoff happens when one of two conditions occurs: reduced flow velocities or filtered runoff. The former can occur by changing a slope gradient, increasing surface roughness, or containing runoff waters. The latter requires a medium through which runoff can flow to capture suspended particles. Both

Making the First Move

Making the First Move

Work on construction sites may increase the rate of erosion by as much as 1,000 times the preconstruction rate, according to EPA. The main problem associated with erosion at these sites is the impact of sediment on water quality. It may contain lead, arsenic, and mercury; oils, petroleum, and VOCs

Making the First Move

Making the First Move

Work on construction sites may increase the rate of erosion by as much as 1,000 times the preconstruction rate, according to EPA. The main problem associated with erosion at these sites is the impact of sediment on water quality. It may contain lead, arsenic, and mercury; oils, petroleum, and VOCs

The Drain Game

The Drain Game

It’s somewhat ironic: When one’s trying to remove soil from an object, it often requires surfactants, manual labor, and copious amounts of water. Yet, when loose soil is struck by rain, it hitches a ride and quickly follows the runoff wherever it may go. Hence the importance of capturing soil

Reining in the Soil

Reining in the Soil

Although erosion control is one of the smaller budget items on a construction site, it is nonetheless one of the most critical: Product performance can make or break regulatory compliance. Given the hit that the construction industry has taken in the past several years, erosion control specialists seek to provide

Los Angeles River Revitalization

Los Angeles River Revitalization

The Los Angeles River begins in headwaters in the San Fernando Valley, where Bell Creek and Calabasas Creek, also known as Arroyo Calabasas, meet in the city of Canoga Park. The river flows only 52 miles to Long Beach, but in its course it falls 795 feet in elevation. That’s

Soil on the Move

Soil on the Move

Silt and sediment management devices may not be as impressive as retaining walls or as subtly beautiful as rain gardens, but they’re the first line of defense against soil that’s on the move. They range from simple wattles to trackout devices to sophisticated polymer treatment systems that reduce turbidity in

New Courses to Debut at EC10

NEW COURSES Innovative Erosion and Sediment Control Design Instructor: Ted Sherrod, PE, CPESC, CPSWQ This fast-paced, one-day workshop is for engineers and advanced-level practitioners who are involved with the design of erosion and sediment control plans for linear and vertical construction. The workshop emphasizes selection and design of appropriate best

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