Tag: seeding equipment

No-till farming (also called zero tillage or direct drilling) is a way of growing crops or pasture from year to year without disturbing the soil through tillage. No-till is an agricultural technique which increases the amount of water that infiltrates into the soil and increases organic matter retention and cycling of nutrients in the soil. In many agricultural regions it can reduce or eliminate soil erosion. It increases the amount and variety of life in and on the soil, including disease-causing organisms and disease suppression organisms. The most powerful benefit of no-tillage is improvement in soil biological fertility, making soils more resilient. Farm operations are made much more efficient, particularly improved time of sowing and better trafficability of farm operations.

Timing Hydroseeding Applications

Timing Hydroseeding Applications

Timing hydroseeding correctly requires balance and planning. Depending on the time of year, contractors like Brian Young, general manager of Fox Erosion Control & Landscape Inc. based in Clackamas, OR, are either fast approaching or past the seeding windows as set for his region by the Oregon Department of Transportation:

Hydroseeding: Protecting the Soil and the Future

Hydroseeding: Protecting the Soil and the Future

Timing hydroseeding correctly requires balance and planning. Today, contractors like Brian Young, general manager of Fox Erosion Control & Landscape Inc. based in Clackamas, OR, are fast approaching the last seeding window of the year as set for his region by the Oregon Department of Transportation: September 1 through October

Downsizing for Hydraulic Seeding Success

Small to midsize hydraulic seeders can’t match the large units in terms of spray coverage per tankload. They can offer some attractive advantages, however, like a more affordable price tag, lower operating costs, and the ability to go where the big rigs can’t while making money doing it.

Winterizing Construction Sites

The arrival of falling temperatures and falling snow doesn’t eliminate the need to protect exposed slopes from erosion. In fact, in areas where much of the annual rainfall comes down between October and April, winter calls for even greater efforts to keep soil on-site and out of rivers, streams, and

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