Tag: soil erosion control

Soil erosion control is the practice of preventing or controlling wind or water erosion in agriculture, land development, coastal areas, river banks and construction. Effective erosion controls are important techniques in preventing water pollution, soil loss, wildlife habitat loss and human property loss.

Revegetating After a Wildfire

Revegetating After a Wildfire

It was in June 2013 that the 3,200-acre Royal Gorge fire broke out near Cañon City, CO, situated about 45 miles southwest of Colorado Springs. The wildfire destroyed almost everything in its path (48 out of 52 structures in Royal Gorge Park were lost), although surprisingly it spared the Royal

Growing It Back

Growing It Back

It was in June 2013 that the 3,200-acre Royal Gorge fire broke out near Cañon City, CO, situated about 45 miles southwest of Colorado Springs. The wildfire destroyed almost everything in its path (48 out of 52 structures in Royal Gorge Park were lost), although surprisingly it spared the Royal

Erosion Control Methods for Steep Slopes

Erosion Control Methods for Steep Slopes

Huge projects like the widening of US 202 in Pennsylvania span several years and several seasons. Stormwater and erosion control is an important part of the planning process, and a variety of soil erosion control devices play a role. Changing topography and limited highway easements sometimes result in steep slopes

Channel Stabilization and Repair Along Streambanks

Channel Stabilization and Repair Along Streambanks

Channel stabilization and repair along streambanks and other waterways usually calls for the use of a channel lining. Safeguards fall into two major categories—soft and hard.

Soft armor, also referred to as flexible or green techniques, consist of grass or vegetation that is established with the help of erosion control blankets,

Post-Fire Erosion Control: A California Case Study

Post-Fire Erosion Control: A California Case Study

On August 17, 2013, a hunter’s illegal fire blazed out of control and started what would become the third-largest forest fire in California history. In the end, a quickly mobilized team from Selby’s Soil Erosion Control and a fast-curing bonded fiber matrix (BFM) from Profile Products would stabilize charred slopes and prevent

Project Profile: Recovering From California’s Third-Largest Fire

Project Profile: Recovering From California’s Third-Largest Fire

On August 17, 2013, A Hunter’s illegal fire blazed out of control and started what would become the third-largest forest fire in California history. In the end, a quickly mobilized team from Selby’s Soil Erosion Control and a fast-curing bonded fiber matrix (BFM) from Profile Products would stabilize charred slopes and prevent

Getting Back to Nature

Getting Back to Nature

The goal of many revegetation projects is often almost heroic: to recreate a wetlands damaged by open-pit coal mining, a salt water marsh drained for farming, or a canyon eroded by wildfire and flood-all based on tiny native seeds. Often these sites require compost, fertilizer, and mulch. In addition to

Racing the Winter: Charlotte Fire Remediation

Racing the Winter: Charlotte Fire Remediation

On June 28, 2012, a fire driven by high winds and scorching summer temperatures ravaged the hills-part of the Bannock Range-south of Pocatello, ID. The accidental fire ignited on Charlotte Drive, located at the upper end of a highly populated mountain community, traveled down the mountainside into the Mink Creek

Sediment Limits: Not Always by the Numbers

Sediment Limits: Not Always by the Numbers

A draft of EPA’s new stormwater rule is scheduled to be released in June 2013, with finalization (after the public comment period) projected for December 2014. The rule, initially scheduled for implementation in November 2012, is expected to include such provisions as integrating green infrastructure into project design; viewing stormwater

Clearing the Air…and Keeping It That Way

Clearing the Air…and Keeping It That Way

In 1306, King Edward I of England proclaimed the first air-quality law. He prohibited the burning of coal in craftsmen’s furnaces because of its smell. Airborne coal particles still produce an unpleasant smell; however, we now know they also constitute a threat to human health. And it isn’t just coal.

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