Tag: soil structure

Soil structure describes the arrangement of the solid parts of the soil and of the pore space located between them. It is determined by how individual soil granules clump or bind together and aggregate, and therefore, the arrangement of soil pores between them. Soil structure has a major influence on water and air movement, biological activity, root growth and seedling emergence.

Stormwater Irrigation

During recent decades there has been a growing national recognition that shrubs and trees in urban landscapes have both environmental and socioeconomic value. Research has shown that vegetation along streets and parking lots can lower urban temperatures and energy consumption (Halverson and Heisler 1981, Scott et al. 1999); filter, degrade,

Improving the Soil

Improving the Soil

In revegetation, everything begins with the soil—usually poor soil.

Soils may become degraded during the construction of buildings, roadside projects, or mining or landfill operations, or because of overgrazing or deforestation. They lose their topsoil, usually the top 2- to 8-inch layer of the soil, where the most important nutrients lie.

Stopping Dust

Stopping Dust

Years ago, dust was an accepted result of construction, of driving on unpaved roads, and of some industrial activities. In 1970, the Clean Air Act changed that. Three types of particulate matter (less than 10 microns, less than 2½ microns, and lead) were classified as health hazards. State and local

Compost: The Sustainable Solution

Compost: The Sustainable Solution

The use of recycled organics is one of our nation’s greatest assets, and we can utilize them to address several of society’s vexing challenges. The commercialization of composting as an economic method to manage organic (carbon-based) “wastes” got its rebirth in the late 1970s, and has grown from coast to

Compost: The Sustainable Solution

Compost: The Sustainable Solution

The use of recycled organics is one of our nation’s greatest assets, and we can utilize them to address several of society’s vexing challenges. The commercialization of composting as an economic method to manage organic (carbon-based) “wastes,” got its rebirth in the late 1970s, and has grown from coast to

Stabilizing Hillsides and Creek Bottoms

Stabilizing Hillsides and Creek Bottoms

The rolling landscape of Scott County, MN, is rural but not particularly remote. “That area is farm country, and the Minnesota River goes through the entire area. On the top of the bluffs it’s farmland, but at the river, the elevation drops about 200 feet in 800 feet,” says Paul

Improving the Soil

Improving the Soil

In revegetation, everything begins with the soil . . . usually poor soil.

Soils may become degraded during the construction of buildings, roadside projects, or mining or landfill operations, or because of overgrazing or deforestation. They lose their topsoil, usually the top 2- to 8-inch layer of the soil, where the

Compost: The Sustainable Solution

Compost: The Sustainable Solution

The use of recycled organics is one of our nation’s greatest assets, and we can utilize them to address several of society’s vexing challenges. The commercialization of composting as an economic method to manage organic (carbon-based) “wastes,” got its rebirth in the late 1970s, and has grown from coast to

Dust Control Product Round Up

Dust Control Product Round Up

Whether you’re working on roads or deep in a mine; dust control is important in the health of the workers, surrounding communities, and neighboring vegetation. Choosing the proper dust control product depends on the needs of the site, the soil, and weather. In this article, author Ed Ritchie examines several

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