Tag: stormwater management practices

control of flooding and erosion;
control of hazardous materials to prevent release of pollutants into the environment (source control);
planning and construction of stormwater systems so contaminants are removed before they pollute surface waters or groundwater resources;
acquisition and protection of natural waterways or rehabilitation;
building “soft” structures such as ponds, swales, wetlands or green infrastructure solutions to work with existing or “hard” drainage structures, such as pipes and concrete channels;
development of funding approaches to stormwater programs potentially including stormwater user fees and the creation of a stormwater utility;
development of long-term asset management programs to repair and replace aging infrastructure;
revision of current stormwater regulations to address comprehensive stormwater needs;
enhancement and enforcement of existing ordinances to make sure property owners consider the effects of stormwater before, during and after development of their land;
education of a community about how its actions affect water quality, and about what it can do to improve water quality; and
planning carefully to create solutions before problems become too great.

Stormwater Goes to School

Not too long ago, there were only two colleges in the United States where one could learn about stormwater management, notes Brant Keller, public works director for Griffin, GA.

Project Profile: Applying the First Two Pillars: A Case Study

Project Profile: Applying the First Two Pillars: A Case Study

Some of the most effective and economical stormwater management practices often go unconsidered as we opt for more traditionally accepted but less effective options. This is evident as we design, teach, implement, and regulate. It is also reflected in our regulations, our handbooks, and even in our trade journals. The

Using the Cloud to Control the Rain – Free Webinar

Using the Cloud to Control the Rain – Free Webinar

Smart Stormwater Management Solutions

You can’t choose the weather, but you can control it. While the majority of our stormwater retention and detention systems are passive in nature (incapable of adjusting their performance to the size or duration of a storm event), new technologies combining cloud-native platforms and the internet-of-things

Free Webinar – Using the Cloud to Control the Rain

Free Webinar – Using the Cloud to Control the Rain

Webinar to discuss stormwater managment BMPs and applications of technolgy

Join Marcus Quigley and Kevin Marsh as they explore the hydrology, design, BMPs, and limitations of typical (passive) stormwater detention and retention systems; the new technologies integrating the internet-of-things (IoT) and cloud-native platforms for an active stormwater management system; and how

Conservation Subdivisions: More Than Just a Stormwater Tool

Conservation Subdivisions: More Than Just a Stormwater Tool

As development costs are skyrocketing and issues like water quality, NPDES, and protection of sensitive areas are coming more to the forefront than ever before, design engineers and developers alike are looking for cost-effective solutions to their development woes. Conservation subdivisions may be an alternative that yields the same number

Barriers to Implementing LID

Barriers to Implementing LID

Low-impact-development stormwater management approaches are gaining in popularity and are being increasingly written into permitting requirements. While a number of barriers to implementation continue to come into play, advocates are finding more solutions to those obstacles, according to experts across the country. “We cannot just trumpet the wonderful qualities of

Project Profile: Bahamas Airport Expansion Continues

Project Profile: Bahamas Airport Expansion Continues

Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA), formerly known as Nassau International Airport, is the largest airport in the Bahamas and the largest international gateway into the country. With two runways, more than 30 gates, and 482,000 square feet of terminal space, the airport sees more than three million passengers per year.

The “Energy Balance” Method of Stormwater Management

By Michael S. Rolband and Frank R. Graziano It is a well-accepted and understood principle that changes in land use within a watershed, primarily related to the increase in impervious area resulting from land development, increase stormwater runoff. This increased flow degrades downstream receiving waters that are insufficient in size

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