Tag: stormwater monitoring

The development of the modern city often results in increased demands for water supply due to population growth, while at the same time altered runoff predicted by climate change has the potential to increase the volume of stormwater that can contribute to drainage and flooding problems. IWM offers several techniques including stormwater harvest (to reduce the amount of water that can cause flooding), infiltration (to restore the natural recharge of groundwater), biofiltration or bioretention (e.g., rain gardens) to store and treat runoff and release it at a controlled rate to reduce impact on streams and wetland treatments (to store and control runoff rates and provide habitat in urban areas).

StormCon Program

StormCon Program

StormCon 2017, the Surface Water Quality Conference & Expo, will take place August 27–31 in Bellevue, WA, at the Meydenbauer Convention Center and Hyatt Regency Hotel. The conference features more than 130 presentations in six conference tracks, plus panel discussions and a tour of local stormwater facilities.
The schedule of presentations

Reader Profile: Mark Doneux

Reader Profile: Mark Doneux

It takes only 10% impervious cover in a watershed before water bodies start becoming impaired. In the St. Paul, MN, region, it’s at 42%. Mitigating that is both satisfying and challenging for Mark Doneux, administrator for the Capitol Region Watershed District (CRWD), one of Minnesota’s 48 watershed districts. It was

Water-Quality Monitoring Delivers Answers—and New Questions

Water-Quality Monitoring Delivers Answers—and New Questions

Aside from a few landlocked lakes and alluvial fans that dot the planet, all stormwater gravitates toward the ocean, and it is at the ocean’s edge that stormwater quality degradation delivers some of its most unpleasant and most visible outcomes. Nutrient pollution threatens coastal ecosystems with eutrophication; fecal contamination from

Reader Profile: Jon Wilson

Reader Profile: Jon Wilson

Many benefits can accrue when municipal staff is involved with helping a state administer a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) industrial stormwater discharge permit. Such is the case in Eugene, OR, where Jon Wilson, CSM, lends technical assistance to carry out a memorandum of agreement (MOA) with the Oregon

Reader Profile: Roger Glick

Reader Profile: Roger Glick

Austin, TX, is a city that’s known for being trendy, cutting-edge, and environmentally pleasing. “One of the big reasons people say they move to Austin is because of the natural environment,” notes Roger Glick, P.E, supervising engineer for Austin’s Watershed Protection Department. He is committed to ensure Austin’s continued environmental

New Tools for Today’s Water Challenges

New Tools for Today’s Water Challenges

Keeping an eye on the temperamental moods of Mother Nature has come a long way from the windsock, thermometer, and rain gauge. Today, engineers, researchers, and environmental managers have an array of equipment that might be dubbed the poster-children of multitasking: digital testing and monitoring tools that can be programmed

Flood Watch: Predicting the Storm

Flood Watch: Predicting the Storm

Editor’s note: This article originally appeared in Stormwater Magazine, January/February 2005 issue. With the recent flooding events in Texas, we realized this topic is extremely timely and important for storm control professionals, and the general population. In the coming days, we will be publishing additional stories from our archives relevant to

Making Rain Gardens Work

Making Rain Gardens Work

By Margaret Buranen Time is the test that reveals how well a rain garden is working. Time tells whether the rain garden’s design and construction are as effective as they were projected to be. Portland, OR, has a number of rain gardens that meet the test of time, including the

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