Tag: stormwater ordinance

The ultimate goal of stormwater management is to maintain the health of streams, lakes and aquatic life as well as provide opportunities for human uses of water by mitigating the effects of urban development. To achieve this goal stormwater management strives to maintain the natural hydrologic cycle, prevent an increased risk of flooding, prevent undesirable stream erosion, and protect water quality.

An Approach for Communities to Assess Stormwater Application and Detention Requirements for Overall Watershed Health

An Approach for Communities to Assess Stormwater Application and Detention Requirements for Overall Watershed Health

Communities, especially those with limited resources, face many issues when trying to protect their local watersheds through the use of stormwater policies. Stormwater policies that are imposed on new development have the ability to enhance a community’s overall watershed health (Ferguson 1998). However, past requirements often relate only to large

Fees for Inspections

Fees for Inspections

The city of Springfield, OH, is considering a change to its stormwater ordinance that would add a fee for inspections of new construction projects. If the change is approved, developers would pay plan review fees of $125 per acre for the first 5 acres, $75 per acre for the next

Rainwater Capture, Water Pollution, and Agricultural Growth

Rainwater Capture, Water Pollution, and Agricultural Growth

I remember what it was like being a kid on a moderately rainy day, walking around the neighborhood sidewalks in rubber boots, swinging my umbrella and feeling that wondrous feeling that must be unique to human beings: being in the natural world but my comfort not determined by nature’s whims.

Greening the Urban Water Supply

Greening the Urban Water Supply

According to the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), cities and suburbs are among the largest sources of water pollution in many parts of the US. As Lawrence Levine wrote in his NRDC Issue Brief, “Waste Less, Pollute Less: Using Urban Water Conservation to Advance Clean Water Act Compliance,” these cities

When the Snow Melts

When the Snow Melts

It might be summer now, but the nation experienced a particularly harsh winter this past year and Chicago, IL, was certainly no exception. The city reached a near-record 80 inches of snowfall for the 2013–2014 winter season and recorded the most days at or below zero of any Chicago winter

Atlanta’s Green Investment

Atlanta’s Green Investment

Two developments guarantee that Atlanta, GA, will see more examples of green infrastructure. The first push comes from Atlanta’s share of a $950 million grant from EPA to encourage green infrastructure in 17 cities. Priority was given to areas of heavy flooding, in neighborhoods with combined sewer systems. Six pilot

Philadelphia

Philadelphia

Philadelphia’s 45 inches of annual rainfall bring the city plenty of stormwater to cope with each year. At 165 locations around the city, sewage routinely overflows into the Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers and other waterways during rainstorms. The Schuylkill supplies drinking water to 1.5 million people in Philadelphia. Both rivers

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