Tag: stormwater outfall

An outfall is defined as any point where a separate storm sewer system discharges to either Water of the United States or to another MS4. Outfalls include discharges from pipes, ditches swales, and other points of concentrated flow.

Protecting the Inlets

Protecting the Inlets

Converting Dirty to Beautiful
The genesis of an ambitious project was all the way back in 2009, when the city of Beaverton, OR, began the process of applying for a capital grant with Metro, an agency that oversees the Portland metropolitan area. Created more than 30 years ago, Metro is designed

Improving the Soil

Improving the Soil

In revegetation, everything begins with the soil . . . usually poor soil.

Soils may become degraded during the construction of buildings, roadside projects, or mining or landfill operations, or because of overgrazing or deforestation. They lose their topsoil, usually the top 2- to 8-inch layer of the soil, where the

Stormwater Management in Coastal North Carolina

Stormwater Management in Coastal North Carolina

“There are three reasons for us to do a stormwater project. One is to fix a flooding problem. Nine out of ten citizens would say this is the main reason. Two is to improve water quality,” says Dave Mayes, Stormwater Services Division manager for the city of Wilmington, NC.

Utilizing GIS to Identify Potential Sources of Illicit Discharges

Utilizing GIS to Identify Potential Sources of Illicit Discharges

Eliminating illicit discharges is one of the most fundamental yet challenging elements of an effective municipal stormwater program. Unregulated discharges from industrial and commercial activities can cause pollutants to slowly accumulate and cause the receiving waterbody to exceed the in-stream water-quality criteria for its designated beneficial use.

Using a Geographic Information System (GIS) to Identify Illicit Discharges

Using a Geographic Information System (GIS) to Identify Illicit Discharges

The city of Eugene’s decision to use a geographic information system (GIS) to identify potential sources of illicit discharges occurred in 2009 when an industrial facility’s aboveground storage tank leaked approximately 730 gallons of off-road diesel in close proximity to the stormwater conveyance system, which discharges to the Willamette River

Quantifying Urban Land-Use Impacts on Suspended Sediment Particle Size Class Distribution

Quantifying Urban Land-Use Impacts on Suspended Sediment Particle Size Class Distribution

Suspended sediment is among the primary causes of freshwater impairment, affecting the biological, chemical, and physical health of aquatic ecosystems (Uri 2001). Excess sediment is associated with a host of aquatic ecosystem impacts including reduced transmission of sunlight, which can inhibit photosynthesis and primary productivity (Campbell et al. 2005). Too

Keeping Inlets Clean and Green

Keeping Inlets Clean and Green

Northern California’s Alameda County, the city of Livermore, and the California Department of Transportation have teamed up to work on a series of improvements on a 4.6-mile stretch of State Route 84. “It’s a widening of Highway 84 beginning about 1 mile south of Interstate 580,” explains Bob Brown, president

Sampling Stormwater

Sampling Stormwater

Illicit Discharge in Milwaukee It’s part of Patrice Eucalano’s job with the city of Milwaukee, WI, to monitor stormwater before it enters the local rivers. “The goal of the city’s stormwater monitoring program is to detect and eliminate illicit discharges to the MS4 [municipal separate storm sewer system],” she explains.

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