Tag: stormwater problems

Modern drainage systems which collect runoff from impervious surfaces (e.g., roofs and roads) ensure that water is efficiently conveyed to waterways through pipe networks, meaning that even small storm events result in increased waterway flows.
In addition to delivering higher pollutants from the urban catchment, increased stormwater flow can lead to stream erosion, encourage weed invasion, and alter natural flow regimes. Native species often rely on such flow regimes for spawning, juvenile development, and migration.

One Way to Get Their Attention

One Way to Get Their Attention

Last December, a sinkhole opened up in the town of Fraser, MI—on Christmas Eve, no less. The cause was a broken 11-foot-diameter sewer pipe located 55 feet underground. The hole eventually measured 250 by 100 feet, causing nearly two dozen homes to be temporarily evacuated. A few are damaged so

Stormwater Management in Coastal North Carolina

Stormwater Management in Coastal North Carolina

“There are three reasons for us to do a stormwater project. One is to fix a flooding problem. Nine out of ten citizens would say this is the main reason. Two is to improve water quality,” says Dave Mayes, Stormwater Services Division manager for the city of Wilmington, NC.

Three Reasons for Stormwater Projects

Three Reasons for Stormwater Projects

“There are three reasons for us to do a stormwater project. One is to fix a flooding problem. Nine out of ten citizens would say this is the main reason. Two is to improve water quality,” says Dave Mayes, Stormwater Services Division manager for the city of Wilmington, NC.

“Three, we

Ann Arbor’s Stormwater Program

Ann Arbor’s Stormwater Program

Located approximately 45 miles from Detroit, MI, Ann Arbor receives about 35 inches of precipitation per year. Much of this precipitation falls in the spring, followed by periods of extreme heat and minimal rain in the summer. Ann Arbor contains several creeksheds that are tributaries of the Huron River: Traver,

The Power of the People

Sanitation District No. 1 of Northern Kentucky realized early that people ultimately would determine the success or failure of a new regional stormwater management program the district stood ready to implement in 1998. Before then, there was no comprehensive stormwater management program covering the 32 municipalities and three counties–Boone, Campbell,

Restoring the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

Restoring the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

Some parts of the Chesapeake Bay are pristine, but other sections are so full of silt and runoff that they appear muddy even at ground level. Years of unregulated agricultural runoff, the growing amount of impervious surface from suburban sprawl, and the bureaucracy of several states intertwined with their own

Taking a Stance on Sprawl

I recently ran head-on into the following phrase: “LID is neutral on growth.” This occurred in the context of a series of presentations in which several colleagues and I presented a design for a small community utilizing a collection of low-impact development (LID) design elements that we have labeled simply

Norman Plans Ahead

Norman Plans Ahead

Like countless municipalities across the nation, the city of Norman, OK, has had to contend with increased flooding and erosion and diminished water quality resulting from urbanization. Home to the University of Oklahoma and a population of approximately 112,000, Norman seeks to address these problems, particularly a decline in water

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