Tag: subsoil

Subsoil is the layer of soil under the topsoil on the surface of the ground. Like topsoil it is composed of a variable mixture of small particles such as sand, silt and/or clay, but it lacks the organic matter and humus content of topsoil. Below the subsoil is the substratum, which can be residual bedrock, sediments, or aeolian deposits. As it is lacking in dark humus, subsoil is usually paler in colour than the overlying topsoil. It may contain the deeper roots of some plants, such as trees, but a majority of plant roots lie within the surface topsoil.

Improving the Soil

Improving the Soil

In revegetation, everything begins with the soil—usually poor soil.

Soils may become degraded during the construction of buildings, roadside projects, or mining or landfill operations, or because of overgrazing or deforestation. They lose their topsoil, usually the top 2- to 8-inch layer of the soil, where the most important nutrients lie.

In Hydroseeding, Weather Matters (A Lot)

In Hydroseeding, Weather Matters (A Lot)

Weather can be a hydroseeding contractor’s friend or foe. It can make a job much easier or much more difficult. It played a role in each of the following varied projects done by leading hydroseeding companies across the country.

Stabilizing Hillsides and Creek Bottoms

Stabilizing Hillsides and Creek Bottoms

The rolling landscape of Scott County, MN, is rural but not particularly remote. “That area is farm country, and the Minnesota River goes through the entire area. On the top of the bluffs it’s farmland, but at the river, the elevation drops about 200 feet in 800 feet,” says Paul

Improving the Soil

Improving the Soil

In revegetation, everything begins with the soil . . . usually poor soil.

Soils may become degraded during the construction of buildings, roadside projects, or mining or landfill operations, or because of overgrazing or deforestation. They lose their topsoil, usually the top 2- to 8-inch layer of the soil, where the

In Hydroseeding, Weather Matters (A Lot)

In Hydroseeding, Weather Matters (A Lot)

Weather can be a hydroseeding contractor’s friend or foe. It can make a job much easier or much more difficult. It played a role in each of the following varied projects done by leading hydroseeding companies across the country.

The UPMC Lemieux Sports Complex near Pittsburgh, PA, is the home of

Project Profile: Applying the First Two Pillars: A Case Study

Project Profile: Applying the First Two Pillars: A Case Study

Some of the most effective and economical stormwater management practices often go unconsidered as we opt for more traditionally accepted but less effective options. This is evident as we design, teach, implement, and regulate. It is also reflected in our regulations, our handbooks, and even in our trade journals. The

Hydroseeding to Amend Soil

Hydroseeding to Amend Soil

An Oregon-based hydroseeding contractor, partner Barry Cook with Northwest Hydro-Mulchers notes that “earth has amazing self-healing properties. I’ve heard it explained a lot like a cut on a human arm,” continues Cook. “If you ignore it, chances are it will get infected and the issues will get complicated. If

Amending the Soil

Amending the Soil

Earth has “amazing self-healing properties,” notes Barry Cook, a partner with Northwest Hydro-Mulchers.
“I’ve heard it explained a lot like a cut on a human arm. If you ignore it, chances are it will get infected and the issues will get complicated. If you clean it and treat it with some

Amending the Soil

Amending the Soil

Earth has “amazing self-healing properties,” notes Barry Cook, a partner with Northwest Hydro-Mulchers. “I’ve heard it explained a lot like a cut on a human arm. If you ignore it, chances are it will get infected and the issues will get complicated. If you clean it and treat it with

Getting Back to Nature

Getting Back to Nature

The goal of many revegetation projects is often almost heroic: to recreate a wetlands damaged by open-pit coal mining, a salt water marsh drained for farming, or a canyon eroded by wildfire and flood-all based on tiny native seeds. Often these sites require compost, fertilizer, and mulch. In addition to

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