Tag: the drought

A drought is a period of below-average precipitation in a given region, resulting in prolonged shortages in its waters supply, whether atmospheric, surface or ground water. A drought can last for months or years, or may be declared after as few as 15 days. It can have a substantial impact on the ecosystem and agriculture of the affected region. Although droughts can persist for several years, even a short, intense drought can cause significant damage and harm to the local economy.

Sidestepping Drought

Sidestepping Drought

THROUGHOUT 2010 TO 2015, water availabil­ity in Texas was plummeting. Learning from California—where a continued drought resulted in mandatory action for water providers—Texan regional water authorities began to implement drought contingency plans, the impact of which would have far reaching consequences for the financial sustainability of water utilities.

Responding to Water Demand

The term “demand management” is more commonly associated with the electricity industry than the world of water, but Matt Dickens, resource conservation manager for Valencia Water Company (VWC) in California, understands the correlation and recognizes that many of the principles of demand response can be applied to water management as well.

29 Million Gallons a Minute

29 Million Gallons a Minute

How would you define the rather nebulous term “green infrastructure” to people who, for the most part, don’t care about stormwater? Now that California is getting rain again and reservoirs are refilling, at least to an extent, many people would like to believe everything’s back to normal and we can

Just Don’t Call It Wastewater

Just Don’t Call It Wastewater

“Everyone talks about the weather, but no one does anything about it,” Mark Twain famously said. It often seems everyone talks about recycling water, too, but too few—especially now with the widespread perception that the drought is over in many places—really practice it.

Twain (after whom a New York golf course

Challenges of Urban Water Infrastructure

Challenges of Urban Water Infrastructure

AT PRESENT, 80.7% OF the US population resides in urban areas (US Census Bureau 2012). Increased urbanization (paved areas and buildings) and urban population growth has exerted significant pressure on urban water demand and expansion of urban water infrastructure—i.e., potable water supplies, wastewater treatment and discharge, and urban stormwater runoff

Urban Water Management

Urban Water Management

AT PRESENT, 80.7% OF the US population resides in urban areas (US Census Bureau 2012). Increased urbanization (paved areas and buildings) and urban population growth has exerted significant pressure on urban water demand and expansion of urban water infrastructure—i.e., potable water supplies, wastewater treatment and discharge, and urban stormwater runoff

All Fall Down

All Fall Down

We wanted rain, and we’ve got rain. Along with flooding in some parts of California, though, the rain has brought other unexpected consequences. Our trees are falling over.

As reported here, the drought has killed more than a hundred million trees throughout the state and has weakened many more; officials estimate

A Renewed Battle Cry Over Water

A Renewed Battle Cry Over Water

President Obama recently signed a $10 billion bill that authorizes various water projects across the country. Two that have gotten the most attention are helping Flint, MI, recover from the lead-tainted drinking water debacle earlier this year ($170 million authorized), and providing relief to some of the people affected by the

Stabilizing Hillsides and Creek Bottoms

Stabilizing Hillsides and Creek Bottoms

The rolling landscape of Scott County, MN, is rural but not particularly remote. “That area is farm country, and the Minnesota River goes through the entire area. On the top of the bluffs it’s farmland, but at the river, the elevation drops about 200 feet in 800 feet,” says Paul

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