Tag: topsoil

Topsoil is the upper, outermost layer of soil, usually the top 2 inches (5.1 cm) to 8 inches (20 cm). It has the highest concentration of organic matter and microorganisms and is where most of the Earth’s biological soil activity occurs. It also houses many organisms.

In Hydroseeding, Weather Matters (A Lot)

In Hydroseeding, Weather Matters (A Lot)

Weather can be a hydroseeding contractor’s friend or foe. It can make a job much easier or much more difficult. It played a role in each of the following varied projects done by leading hydroseeding companies across the country.

Increasing Machine Utilization With Attachments

Increasing Machine Utilization With Attachments

Editor’s note: This article first appeared in the January/February 2016 issue of Grading & Excavation Contractor.

Industry experts agree: using a piece of compact ­equipment with multiple attachments turns that one machine into a multipurpose tool for road construction site preparation work that can help contractors complete their jobs more efficiently, bid on

The Science of Seeds

The Science of Seeds

Remember how 10 blindfolded people in a room each describe the elephant from their own perspective? The same might be said of soil—the stuff we interchangeably refer to as ground, dirt, or surface covering. Eric C. Brevik, a professor of soil science at Dickinson State University in North Dakota, illustrates

Insights From the Journey

Insights From the Journey

One of the great gifts of writing is the knowledge that one gains from the research necessary to create intelligent composition. My high school English teacher—who also taught Kurt Vonnegut—once told me that there were seven basic plots in literature and not to worry about outlining a wholly original narrative,

Wildfires: Challenges in Revegetation

Wildfires: Challenges in Revegetation

It was the setting for a perfect disaster: historic level droughts, acres of dry forest and grassland, huge reserves of dead wood fuel, and a hurricane that sucked any moisture from the air. Locals said it was just “powder-keg dry.” Implementing a revegetation plan after a wildfire is a challenge;

Improving the Soil

Improving the Soil

In revegetation, everything begins with the soil—usually poor soil.

Soils may become degraded during the construction of buildings, roadside projects, or mining or landfill operations, or because of overgrazing or deforestation. They lose their topsoil, usually the top 2- to 8-inch layer of the soil, where the most important nutrients lie.

Geogrids for Stabilizing Steep Slopes

Geogrids for Stabilizing Steep Slopes

The steep slopes and compressible soils caused concern that the road might, sometime in the future, shift and even crack if precast concrete panel retaining walls were used. Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) officials suggested that 1:1 slope reinforcement with geogrid be used instead.

Stopping Erosion Flat Out

Stopping Erosion Flat Out

Twenty years ago my brother and I started out as small excavating and general contractors,” says Chauncey Webster, president of East Coast Green Inc., in St. Thomas, PA. “Gradually we leaned more and more toward erosion control work.”

Taking the Measure of Methods for Estimating Earthwork Volumes

Taking the Measure of Methods for Estimating Earthwork Volumes

For earthwork contractors the key to survival is an accurate estimate of earthwork volumes. Without an accurate estimate of earthwork volumes, the contractor will be unable to properly assign construction assets or formulate a project schedule. Estimating earthwork construction requires many assumptions and unknowns.

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