Tag: types of waste

Liquid type:
Waste can come in non-solid form. Some solid waste can also be converted to a liquid waste form for disposal. It includes point source and non-point source discharges such as storm water and wastewater. Examples of liquid waste include wash water from homes, liquids used for cleaning in industries and waste detergents.

Solid type:
Solid waste predominantly, is any garbage, refuse or rubbish that we make in our homes and other places. These include old car tires, old newspapers, broken furniture and even food waste. They may include any waste that is non-liquid.

Hazardous type:
Hazardous or harmful waste are those that potentially threaten public health or the environment. Such waste could be inflammable (can easily catch fire), reactive (can easily explode), corrosive (can easily eat through metal) or toxic (poisonous to human and animals). In many countries, it is required by law to involve the appropriate authority to supervise the disposal of such hazardous waste. Examples include fire extinguishers, old propane tanks, pesticides, mercury-containing equipment (e.g, thermostats) and lamps (e.g. fluorescent bulbs) and batteries.
(More on hazardous waste here)

Organic type:
organic waste garbage
Organic waste comes from plants or animals sources. Commonly, they include food waste, fruit and vegetable peels, flower trimmings and even dog poop can be classified as organic waste. They are biodegradable (this means they are easily broken down by other organisms over time and turned into manure). Many people turn their organic waste into compost and use them in their gardens.

Recyclable type:
Recycling is processing used materials (waste) into new, useful products. This is done to reduce the use of raw materials that would have been used. Waste that can be potentially recycled is termed “Recyclable waste”. Aluminum products (like soda, milk and tomato cans), Plastics (grocery shopping bags, plastic bottles), Glass products (like wine and beer bottles, broken glass), Paper products (used envelopes, newspapers and magazines, cardboard boxes) can be recycled and fall into this category.

What’s That Smell?

What’s That Smell?

In many ways, material recovery facilities (MRFs) are harsher work environments than landfill working faces. During both operations, the protection of human health and the environment are primary concerns. While not exposed to the elements, the management of waste in a confined building has its own hazards. Enclosed facilities that

Odor-No-More, Inc. signs National Purchasing Agreement with Waste Connections

Odor-No-More, Inc. signs National Purchasing Agreement with Waste Connections

WESTMINSTER, CA – (April 21, 2017) Odor-No-More, Inc., a subsidiary of BioLargo, Inc. (OTCQB : BLGO), announced it has signed a “National Purchasing Agreement” (“NPA”) with Waste Connections, Inc., a leading integrated solid waste and recycling service company headquartered in The Woodlands, TX.

The NPA provides a discounted pricing schedule for

Magnets, Electromagnets, and Eddy Current Separators

Magnets, Electromagnets, and Eddy Current Separators

Recycling is not an easy thing to do, and its difficulties increase with scale. For large communities and cities, industrial scale recycling operations are required. This further requires the adoption of industrial methods utilizing specialized machinery that can extract specific materials from the wastestream with sufficient capacity to manage incoming

Blast From the Past

Blast From the Past

In my slow but steady weekend activity of culling files from the long past, I came upon this posting filed in September 2001 on a mini storage tape diskette that was state-of-the-art for storage at the time. It was written in response to a question from a reader. In line

Landfill Mining: Current Trends

The beneficial purposes can include recovery of recyclable materials, recovery of soils for use as daily or intermediate cover in active landfills, or recovery of land area for redevelopment. As urban sprawl has continued in many metropolitan areas, landfills—which previously were located in areas relatively distant from the population centers—are

The Mechanics of Waste Compaction

The Mechanics of Waste Compaction

Many landfill managers believe there is a simple formula for achieving maximum landfill compaction density: A + B = C And it sounds pretty straightforward. Given: A-Achieving optimum waste compaction is a cornerstone of proper landfill operation. True B-Buying a steel-wheeled landfill compactor is the industry-accepted means of achieving optimum

A Different Kind of Operation

A Different Kind of Operation

When most people think of waste collection, they think of the weekly waste pickup at the curb outside the home. For most of us, the typical waste collection truck loaded by men picking up individual trash cans and dumping them in the back of the truck is all there is

Using Wastes and Byproducts in Road Construction

Using Wastes and Byproducts in Road Construction

The US Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and agencies around the world have long permitted the use of recycled waste and other by-products in roadway construction to improve performance, reduce costs, improve sustainability, and reduce environmental impact. Are you using wastes and by-products in your roadway construction? And if not…should you

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