Tag: urban stormwater

Because impervious surfaces (parking lots, roads, buildings, compacted soil) do not allow rain to infiltrate into the ground, more runoff is generated than in the undeveloped condition. This additional runoff can erode watercourses (streams and rivers) as well as cause flooding after the stormwater collection system is overwhelmed by the additional flow. Because the water is flushed out of the watershed during the storm event, little infiltrates the soil, replenishes groundwater, or supplies stream baseflow in dry weather.

StormCon Program

StormCon Program

StormCon 2017, the Surface Water Quality Conference & Expo, will take place August 27–31 in Bellevue, WA, at the Meydenbauer Convention Center and Hyatt Regency Hotel. The conference features more than 130 presentations in six conference tracks, plus panel discussions and a tour of local stormwater facilities.
The schedule of presentations

Editor’s Comments: Where Do We Go From Here?

Editor’s Comments: Where Do We Go From Here?

A little more than two years ago, I wrote an editorial for Stormwater—Erosion Control’s sister publication—about the agri­cultural exemption from many of our water-quality regulations. While urban areas and construction sites are subject to National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits and other requirements, agricultural operations have less oversight, and their

Reader Profile: Mark Doneux

Reader Profile: Mark Doneux

It takes only 10% impervious cover in a watershed before water bodies start becoming impaired. In the St. Paul, MN, region, it’s at 42%. Mitigating that is both satisfying and challenging for Mark Doneux, administrator for the Capitol Region Watershed District (CRWD), one of Minnesota’s 48 watershed districts. It was

Challenges of Urban Water Infrastructure

Challenges of Urban Water Infrastructure

AT PRESENT, 80.7% OF the US population resides in urban areas (US Census Bureau 2012). Increased urbanization (paved areas and buildings) and urban population growth has exerted significant pressure on urban water demand and expansion of urban water infrastructure—i.e., potable water supplies, wastewater treatment and discharge, and urban stormwater runoff

Urban Water Management

Urban Water Management

AT PRESENT, 80.7% OF the US population resides in urban areas (US Census Bureau 2012). Increased urbanization (paved areas and buildings) and urban population growth has exerted significant pressure on urban water demand and expansion of urban water infrastructure—i.e., potable water supplies, wastewater treatment and discharge, and urban stormwater runoff

“Mildly Radioactive”

“Mildly Radioactive”

Those of us concerned with surface water quality generally keep a wary eye on the amount of nutrients entering our lakes and rivers. Nitrogen and phosphorus from fertilizers—much of it from agricultural lands, some from urban stormwater runoff—are a big contributor to algae blooms and dead zones, and in high

Energy Reservoirs

Energy Reservoirs

“It takes a lot of water to make electricity and it takes a lot of electricity to pump, move, and, now, recycle and reuse water,” writes Joe Grindstaff, general manager of Inland Empire Utilities Agency (IEUA) on the interconnectedness of these two resources.

IEUA provides wastewater collection and treatment services

Who Should Pay? Navigating the Narrow Path to Fair Utility Fees

Who Should Pay? Navigating the Narrow Path to Fair Utility Fees

We’ve published quite a few articles about the thorny process of setting up a stormwater utility, about what works and what—sometimes spectacularly—fails. Although utilities are a good way for a city to generate a reliable, steady income, they often meet with resistance from a whole lot of people—from residents who

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