Tag: water distribution system

A water supply system is a system for the collection, transmission, treatment, storage and distribution of water from source to consumers, for example, homes, commercial establishments, industry, irrigation facilities and public agencies for water—related activities (fire—fighting, street flushing and so forth).

On the Pulse

On the Pulse

The town of Olds in Alberta, Canada, faced a daunting task. The public works and utilities department, serving the town of approximately 8,000, set out in 2007 to decrease the municipality’s total water usage by 10% by January 2017, using the amount of water it consumed in 2006 as a

Preventing Water Loss in Storage Tanks

Preventing Water Loss in Storage Tanks

A 49-year-old water storage tank leaking water eventually led the town of Chapmanville, WV, to replace its 75-year old water distribution system in 2015. Eventually, it learned that the town’s distribution lines were also leaking like sieves. Together, the distribution lines and leaking storage tank were losing more than half

Preventing Loss

Preventing Loss

A 49-year-old water storage tank leaking water eventually led the town of Chapmanville, WV, to replace its 75-year old water distribution system in 2015. Eventually, it learned that the town’s distribution lines were also leaking like sieves. Together, the distribution lines and leaking storage tank were losing more than half

Straight to the Source

Straight to the Source

Leak detection is one of the highest priorities of any water distribution system operator. Leaks are the result of structural failures to the containment integrity of a water supply system’s distribution pipe network. These failures can occur anywhere in the pipe system but mostly occur at pipe joints and fittings.

Counting the Drops

Counting the Drops

Leaks are never good, whether it’s a leaky boat or a leaky pipe system. Even advanced water utility systems can experience water loses ranging from 10 to 40%, with these losses being proportional to the population of the urban area serviced by the water distribution system. Large cities like New York,

Report: Direct Potable Reuse

Report: Direct Potable Reuse

In a long-awaited report released in September, the California State Water Resources Board concludes that direct potable reuse (DPR) is technically feasible and promises to begin writing the criteria while research continues. The report stresses the fact that “Well-crafted objective criteria that are unambiguous and enable an objective determination of

Keeping Water Quality Contained

Keeping Water Quality Contained

Whether cost or a myriad of other reasons make connecting an individual site’s water supply to a municipal water supply unfeasible, many applications require storage of a large volume of water. In many of these applications, whether they are for potable or non-potable water, facility owners must meet a water

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