Tag: water footprint

The water footprint of an individual, community or business is defined as the total volume of freshwater used to produce the goods and services consumed by the individual or community or produced by the business. Water use is measured in water volume consumed (evaporated) and/or polluted per unit of time. A water footprint can be calculated for any well-defined group of consumers (e.g., an individual, family, village, city, province, state or nation) or producers (e.g., a public organization, private enterprise or economic sector). The water footprint is a geographically explicit indicator, not only showing volumes of water use and pollution, but also the locations.

Surprising Water Facts You Should Know

Surprising Water Facts You Should Know

One in six gallons (nearly 17%) of water leak from utility pipes before reaching customers in the US.1

On average, 10 gallons per day of your water footprint (or 14% of your indoor use) is lost to leaks.2

Household leaks can waste more than 1 trillion gallons annually nationwide. That’s equal to the annual

Skywell Brings Air Water to Southern California Businesses

Skywell Brings Air Water to Southern California Businesses

LOS ANGELES,  Sept. 10, 2014 — Imagine filling your glass with clean, fresh drinking water made from the air.  While it may sound like science fiction, a new Los Angeles-based company, Skywell, LLC, is making it a reality in Southern California.  In the midst of the region’s worst drought in

ISO – Water Footprint Standard Published

ISO – Water Footprint Standard Published

ISO, International Standards Organization, has just published a standard for measuring your water footprint. ISO 14046: Environmental management — Water footprint — Principles, requirements and guidelines, published today, will allow all kinds of organizations, from industry, to government and NGOs the means to measure their “˜water footprint’, or their potential

Editor’s Comments: Water Moving Everywhere

Like everything else in these highly developed times, the pathways our water travels are becoming ever more connected. Though nature’s hydrologic cycle means water on earth has always been one moving, fluid entity, much of it nonetheless became portioned out and recycled in discrete locations called watersheds. Beyond those regions,

Reconciling Water Resources and Energy Needs

“What cost are you willing to pay for energy independence?” I asked in a recent blog post . “Does it make sense to sacrifice our water quality to achieve a lower price at the pump?” We all know it takes energy to collect, treat, and deliver water. Many of us

Reuse: What in the World Is the Water Efficiency Equation?

Reuse: What in the World Is the Water Efficiency Equation?

Unlike Albert Einstein’s famous relativity equations or the Pythagorean Theorem, the water efficiency equation is neither famous nor constant. The specific factors and associated weights that determine water efficiency vary over time and even then are subjective. The best we can do to define the ever-evolving water efficiency equation and

Advanced Adoption

Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) technology is engaging water consumers in the process of understanding their usage in a more pinpointed fashion. As present “smart” technology addresses those issues and mechanical systems are phased out and fixed, network systems are adopted with greater frequency. Future technology now on the drawing board

Double Impact

Double Impact

In speaking of the need for water recycling, Jim Lauria, vice president of sales and marketing for Amiad USA, says the fact that communities are using drinking water to flush toilets is “just insane.” He continues: “Not every application needs the highest-quality water, so, in many instances in the United

Corp-Print

“Economic factors are driving the interest in water efficiency in American industry. If you’re not green, you’re wasting money. Being green is about being careful and thoughtful about expenses and not wasting water you pay for, like potable water.” – Jack Wittman, Director of the hydrogeology group at Layne Christensen.

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