Tag: wetlands

A wetland is a land area that is saturated with water, either permanently or seasonally, such that it takes on the characteristics of a distinct ecosystem. The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other land forms or water bodies is the characteristic vegetation of aquatic plants, adapted to the unique hydric soil. Wetlands play a number of roles in the environment, principally water purification, flood control, carbon sink and shoreline stability. Wetlands are also considered the most biologically diverse of all ecosystems, serving as home to a wide range of plant and animal life.

Getting a Grip on Sea Level Rise

Getting a Grip on Sea Level Rise

Climate change, sea level rise, failing infrastructure, and challenged ­budgets are a recipe for disaster in the truest sense. However, while the fact of sea level rise is scientifically undisputed, it is a slow-moving disaster. No one will wake up and find Miami or New York suddenly under water. Yet,

A New Roadmap to Reduce Coastal Risk

A New Roadmap to Reduce Coastal Risk

There is a saying that the only thing constant in life is change. In the realm of coastal environments, nothing could be more true. The shifting winds, the tides, and rains are what has created the often beautiful vistas of coastal landscape, the diversity of habitats and ecosystems: stones ground

Something Even Worse Than Coastal Erosion

Something Even Worse Than Coastal Erosion

We’re used to thinking about the consequences of coastal erosion, and maybe even of sea level rise: things that make the shoreline slowly recede or the water slowly get higher, resulting in problems either way. What we’re not necessarily accustomed to—but perhaps should be thinking about now—is a sudden, dramatic

Smart Irrigation Reduces Nitrogen Leaching

Smart Irrigation Reduces Nitrogen Leaching

While nitrogen is critical for agricultural production, too much nitrogen can negatively affect health and the environment. Ironically, excess nitrogen can even produce a harmful effect on crop yield, as well as native species and biodiversity.

A report from the Agricultural Sustainability Institute at the University of California, Davis, published by

Reader Profile: Monika Freyman

Reader Profile: Monika Freyman

Every day, Monika Freyman strives to more closely connect the scientific and financial fields as they relate to water. She serves as director of investor water initiatives at Ceres, a non-profit organization that works with leading companies, investors, public interest groups, policymakers, and other economic players to advance sustainable solutions

Smart Irrigation Reduces Nitrogen Leaching

Smart Irrigation Reduces Nitrogen Leaching

While nitrogen is critical for agricultural production, too much nitrogen can negatively affect health and the environment. Ironically, excess nitrogen can even produce a harmful effect on crop yield, as well as native species and biodiversity.

A report from the Agricultural Sustainability Institute at the University of California, Davis, published by

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