About the Author

Janice Kaspersen

Janice Kaspersen

Janice Kaspersen is the editor of Erosion Control and Stormwater magazines. She works with experts throughout the erosion and sediment control industry and the stormwater industry to produce articles relevant to professionals working in both of these fields. Topics covered regularly in the magazines include best management practices for erosion control and stormwater management; green infrastructure, such as bioswales, rain gardens, pervious pavement, and rainwater harvesting systems, as a supplement to traditional “gray” infrastructure; stormwater management and erosion and sediment control techniques for construction sites; urban retrofit and redevelopment; and the many evolving Clean Water Act regulations. She has researched and written articles on topics ranging from coastal erosion to stormwater program funding.

Janice also puts together the speaker program portion of Forester Media’s StormCon, the North American Surface Water Quality Conference and Exposition, which is in its fourteenth year. The annual StormCon conference brings together surface water professionals, engineers, municipal program managers, researchers, regulators, and others concerned with water quality. Conference program tracks include Best Management Practices, Green Infrastructure, Stormwater Program Management, Water-Quality Monitoring, Advanced Research, and Industrial Stormwater Management.

Before joining Forester Media, Janice worked as a technical writer and editor for a government research laboratory. She has a degree in English and anthropology from the University of Arizona. She holds a certification from the Board of Editors in the Life Sciences.

Articles by Janice Kaspersen

Spies With Feathers

Water

Spies With Feathers

Among the many surface water concerns that stormwater managers need to be aware of, particularly in coastal areas, is the health of fisheries. Temperature, water quality, debris, erosion, ocean acidification—all of these affect them, and all can be connected back, in some way, to stormwater management.

One thing a bit outside

Closing Up

Weekly

Closing Up

Researchers at the University of California Riverside and elsewhere have just published a paper linking the effects of climate change to more frequent and intense flooding. It has to do with the effects of temperature, rainfall, and humidity on the macropores in the soil—that is, the spaces larger than 0.08

The Uninvited

Water

The Uninvited

Stormwater ponds in Ontario have some unexpected, and unwanted, guests: goldfish. Thousands and thousands of them. And they’re stirring up trouble—or at least sediment.

The goldfish are a species of carp, native to Asia and considered invasive in North America. Unlike other species of Asian carp that threaten the Great

Banking on Soil

Weekly

Banking on Soil

What’s a commodity in short supply in many large cities? There are many possible answers—parking spaces, reliable public transportation, affordable housing—but New York City is focusing on dirt.

As this New York Times article explains, the city has set up a Clean Soil Bank, “a soil exchange that pairs local

Unzipped

Water

Unzipped

What if one morning the news contained, rather than more problems for you to contemplate, the solution to a longstanding dilemma? Thanks to researchers at the University of Illinois and elsewhere, we might have at least the beginning of an answer to the plastics problem.

All the editors here at

Two Million Tons of Sediment

Soil

Two Million Tons of Sediment

Any number of problems are blamed on dams: flooding when they fail, downstream sedimentation when they’re removed, disruption of habitat and fish passage when they simply exist. Recently in the Chesapeake Bay region, officials are blaming one particular dam, and those who control its floodgates, for a trash problem.

Heavy

Boxed In

Water

Boxed In

Passing through an airport a few weeks ago, and having just had a water bottle confiscated at the security checkpoint (yes, I’m sorry to say I was one of those people who forgot all about the bottle in my carry-on and got pulled out of line), I stopped at a

New Tastes to Save the Soil

Soil

New Tastes to Save the Soil

When’s the last time you tried a kedondong berry? As changes to the climate and soils—drought, desertification, and rising temperatures—threaten production of the most common crops, scientists are looking at ways to bring back local or “alternative” crops. Today, about two-thirds of the world’s agricultural output is limited to just

A New Direction and a New Event

Water

A New Direction and a New Event

Thanks to all of you who joined us last week at StormCon in Denver. Next year we’re heading east: StormCon 2019 will take place in Atlanta, GA, August 18–22, 2019. You can see more information—and the call for speakers coming soon—at www.stormcon.com.

Before that, though, we have another event we’re