About the Author

Janice Kaspersen

Janice Kaspersen

Janice Kaspersen is the editor of Erosion Control and Stormwater magazines. She works with experts throughout the erosion and sediment control industry and the stormwater industry to produce articles relevant to professionals working in both of these fields. Topics covered regularly in the magazines include best management practices for erosion control and stormwater management; green infrastructure, such as bioswales, rain gardens, pervious pavement, and rainwater harvesting systems, as a supplement to traditional “gray” infrastructure; stormwater management and erosion and sediment control techniques for construction sites; urban retrofit and redevelopment; and the many evolving Clean Water Act regulations. She has researched and written articles on topics ranging from coastal erosion to stormwater program funding.

Janice also puts together the speaker program portion of Forester Media’s StormCon, the North American Surface Water Quality Conference and Exposition, which is in its fourteenth year. The annual StormCon conference brings together surface water professionals, engineers, municipal program managers, researchers, regulators, and others concerned with water quality. Conference program tracks include Best Management Practices, Green Infrastructure, Stormwater Program Management, Water-Quality Monitoring, Advanced Research, and Industrial Stormwater Management.

Before joining Forester Media, Janice worked as a technical writer and editor for a government research laboratory. She has a degree in English and anthropology from the University of Arizona. She holds a certification from the Board of Editors in the Life Sciences.

Articles by Janice Kaspersen

They Saved Lives

Water

They Saved Lives

Last August, the National Hurricane Center unveiled changes to its warning system. For the first time, it began issuing watches and warnings specifically for storm surges ahead of a predicted hurricane. That was in addition to its usual practice of issuing warnings for high-winds, which do not necessarily correspond to

Into the Woods

Soil

Into the Woods

How much time do you spend in the forest? According to an organization that dedicates a lot of effort to studying these things, the average American visits a wooded area—and this can include an urban forest—110 days each year.

Recreation is only a small part of what forests provide, though,

Happier—And More Likely to Be Eaten

Water

Happier—And More Likely to Be Eaten

Medicines that have long been marketed as beneficial for humans are having decidedly different effects on other species. As we take more, they take more as well; 12.7% of Americans over the age of 12 now take antidepressants, up from 7.7% about two decades ago. And researchers are finding correspondingly

How to Define “Public Benefit”?

Soil

How to Define “Public Benefit”?

The drought is far from over, and many California communities are preparing for future water scarcity better than they have before, or at least trying to, by enlarging their reservoirs. But they’re hitting a snag when they try to get state funding for building new dams or otherwise expanding their

TMDLs in Court

Water

TMDLs in Court

The Clean Water Rule has suffered a few blows; last week the Trump administration suspended it, pending a planned issue of its own version sometime this year, and a couple of weeks before that the Supreme Court ruled that only federal district courts, not appeals courts, should have jurisdiction in

A Million Tons Down

Soil

A Million Tons Down

As milestones go, this is a somewhat disheartening one: A California paper reports that one million tons of debris from the fires last October in the northern part of the state have now been removed. Good that it’s done, of course, but the number just emphasizes the scope of the

Editor’s Comments: Close to Home

Erosion Control Magazine

Editor’s Comments: Close to Home

This is not the editorial I’d hoped to write for this issue of the magazine—or for any issue, for that matter. But the events of the past weeks here have made it difficult to write about anything else.

The offices of Forester Media, which publishes Erosion Control, are in Santa ­Barbara,

How Not to End Up Like Cape Town

Water

How Not to End Up Like Cape Town

As you might have heard, Cape Town, South Africa, is about to run out of water. Officials have predicted that “Day Zero,” when the water reserves drop so low that they’ll have to shut off the supply to the taps, will occur within the next few months. Despite severe restrictions

Should We Leave It Alone?

Soil

Should We Leave It Alone?

It’s tempting, after a disaster of any proportion, to do something immediately to try to fix the situation. In the case of wildfire, revegetating the burned area quickly is often seen as an essential step, especially if the fire occurs just before the rainy season, to prevent erosion, flooding, and—in