About the Author

Janice Kaspersen

Janice Kaspersen

Janice Kaspersen is the editor of Erosion Control and Stormwater magazines. She works with experts throughout the erosion and sediment control industry and the stormwater industry to produce articles relevant to professionals working in both of these fields. Topics covered regularly in the magazines include best management practices for erosion control and stormwater management; green infrastructure, such as bioswales, rain gardens, pervious pavement, and rainwater harvesting systems, as a supplement to traditional “gray” infrastructure; stormwater management and erosion and sediment control techniques for construction sites; urban retrofit and redevelopment; and the many evolving Clean Water Act regulations. She has researched and written articles on topics ranging from coastal erosion to stormwater program funding.

Janice also puts together the speaker program portion of Forester Media’s StormCon, the North American Surface Water Quality Conference and Exposition, which is in its fourteenth year. The annual StormCon conference brings together surface water professionals, engineers, municipal program managers, researchers, regulators, and others concerned with water quality. Conference program tracks include Best Management Practices, Green Infrastructure, Stormwater Program Management, Water-Quality Monitoring, Advanced Research, and Industrial Stormwater Management.

Before joining Forester Media, Janice worked as a technical writer and editor for a government research laboratory. She has a degree in English and anthropology from the University of Arizona. She holds a certification from the Board of Editors in the Life Sciences.

Articles by Janice Kaspersen

Meatless Monday—and Every Day—at the Office

Water

Meatless Monday—and Every Day—at the Office

Two weeks ago, I wrote about efforts to cultivate algae as a food source. Proponents of algae-based nutrition point out that 70% of the world’s freshwater use goes into raising crops and livestock. We’ve also touched on the issue here, comparing how much water various types of food—especially meats—take to

Reconnecting Floodplains

Soil

Reconnecting Floodplains

It’s getting harder to predict the weather. As this New York Times article points out, “Researchers say it is unclear whether climate change will make California drier or wetter on average. What is more certain is that the state will increasingly whipsaw between extremes, with drier dry years, wetter wet

Adopt-a-Goat

Water

Adopt-a-Goat

What’s red and blue and devours almost anything?

An inexpensive, low-tech device is being deployed throughout Florida and other southeastern states to capture trash in the waterways. Distributed by the nonprofit organization Bigwater Foundation, the floatable device consists of a chain of buoyant plastic balls and a net. It’s called

Glossing Over the Problem

Soil

Glossing Over the Problem

At some point, the editors of all of Forester’s publications have addressed the problems with infrastructure in the US: too little funding, too much needing to be done, too many arguments about what should have the highest priority. You can see a roundup here of some industry experts’ opinions.

It

Erosion Control—Reader Favorites

Daily News

Erosion Control—Reader Favorites

Listed below are the top Editor Blogs, Reader Favorite articles, and Erosion Control magazine articles for you to enjoy. This list is curated based on reader views, search traffic, e-mail click-through, and most commented articles.

Bookmark this page so you will always have quick access to Forester Media’s top Erosion Control

A Whole New Menu

Water

A Whole New Menu

“Beef. It’s what’s for dinner” has long been the slogan of the Cattlemen’s Beef Board and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. If a new group of entrepreneurs has their way, we might all be eating something cheaper and greener (in every sense) instead.

All across the country, especially in warmer weather, algae

Catching Up to What’s Already Here

Soil

Catching Up to What’s Already Here

A debate that’s happening in many different cities across the US is being played out right now in the mid-sized community of Greenville, NC. The city’s population is just shy of 90,000—although there are nearly 175,000 in the entire metropolitan area—and it’s growing at a fairly rapid pace. And that’s

Sacred Sponge

Water

Sacred Sponge

A few weeks ago, one of my fellow editors here at Forester, Rachel Sim, wrote a terrific blog post about death—or rather, about some of the stormwater and groundwater issues particular to cemeteries. If you’ve never given much thought to how coffin varnish and embalming fluid might affect the water

The Fog Catchers

Soil

The Fog Catchers

In the 1946 short story “Miss Winters and the Wind,” a woman tries to capture the wind in a bedsheet; the results aren’t quite what she’d intended. Today, a small farming community in Chile is having better luck catching fog in a net.

As we face the possibility of increasingly longer