About the Author

Janice Kaspersen

Janice Kaspersen

Janice Kaspersen is the editor of Erosion Control and Stormwater magazines. She works with experts throughout the erosion and sediment control industry and the stormwater industry to produce articles relevant to professionals working in both of these fields. Topics covered regularly in the magazines include best management practices for erosion control and stormwater management; green infrastructure, such as bioswales, rain gardens, pervious pavement, and rainwater harvesting systems, as a supplement to traditional “gray” infrastructure; stormwater management and erosion and sediment control techniques for construction sites; urban retrofit and redevelopment; and the many evolving Clean Water Act regulations. She has researched and written articles on topics ranging from coastal erosion to stormwater program funding.

Janice also puts together the speaker program portion of Forester Media’s StormCon, the North American Surface Water Quality Conference and Exposition, which is in its fourteenth year. The annual StormCon conference brings together surface water professionals, engineers, municipal program managers, researchers, regulators, and others concerned with water quality. Conference program tracks include Best Management Practices, Green Infrastructure, Stormwater Program Management, Water-Quality Monitoring, Advanced Research, and Industrial Stormwater Management.

Before joining Forester Media, Janice worked as a technical writer and editor for a government research laboratory. She has a degree in English and anthropology from the University of Arizona. She holds a certification from the Board of Editors in the Life Sciences.

Articles by Janice Kaspersen

A Burning Question

Water

A Burning Question

Just in time for summer, the state of Hawaii is trying to eliminate some forms of sunscreen lotion. Two common chemicals in sunscreen products, oxybenzone and octinoxate, have been shown to kill marine life, particularly coral. Last week, Hawaii’s state legislature voted to ban the sale of the two chemicals

The Dinosaur in the Room

Soil

The Dinosaur in the Room

It might have happened to you at one time or another: A project you were working on got delayed—or, even worse, canceled completely—because historical or archaeological artifacts were discovered at the site. Ideally, an archaeological survey takes place long before work begins, but every so often something is uncovered during

Going to the Dogs

Water

Going to the Dogs

Oh, the irony. Last week, a Boston-area neighborhood was flooded after a storm drain clogged. When city workers in Canton, MA, delved into the problem, they found a 3,600-foot-long blockage inside a drainage pipe.

Now, we know all sorts of materials can cause clogged pipes. Disposable wipes—now almost universally known

Treasures in the Mud

Soil

Treasures in the Mud

Several weeks ago, Japanese researchers announced the discovery of a treasure trove off the coast of Minamitori Island: a tremendous amount of rare-earth minerals. As this article notes, rare-earth elements—17 in all, including the lanthanides plus scandium and yttrium—are much in demand for a growing number of high-tech applications like

Stormwater Treatment With a Different Face

Water

Stormwater Treatment With a Different Face

Managing stormwater is usually a utilitarian function. Occasionally it can rise to an art.

A number of facilities combine stormwater treatment with another role, such as providing green space or recreational facilities for the public at large. One of these is Indianapolis’s Cultural Trail, an 8-mile walking, jogging, and biking

A Long Dry Spell

Soil

A Long Dry Spell

As of mid-April, one-third of the continental US is considered to be in a state of drought. The area affected is increasing, and various cities and states are considering making their temporary water restrictions permanent—perhaps a sign that we’re starting to consider the drought the new normal.

As this article

The $10 Million Phosphorus Race

Weekly

The $10 Million Phosphorus Race

In the 1963 movie It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad World, a group of strangers competed to find $350,000 of stolen, buried cash. Today, that amount sounds much less impressive than it used to, but a much different group is racing to win $10 million by solving a persistent water-quality problem:

The Birds, the Bees, and the Lawsuit

Soil

The Birds, the Bees, and the Lawsuit

Two projects in different parts of the country are highlighting the potential conflict between the needs of the people and the needs of wildlife. Both illustrate, in different ways, the tricky juggling act agencies like the US Army Corps of Engineers must perform to balance diverse—sometimes incompatible—priorities as they manage