Soil

Erosion Control Weekly

Reconnecting Floodplains

Reconnecting Floodplains

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It’s getting harder to predict the weather. As this New York Times article points out, “Researchers say it is unclear whether climate change will make California drier or wetter on average. What is more certain is that the state will increasingly whipsaw between extremes, with drier dry years, wetter wet  … Read More

Erosion Control—Reader Favorites

Erosion Control—Reader Favorites

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Listed below are the top Editor Blogs, Reader Favorite articles, and Erosion Control magazine articles for you to enjoy. This list is curated based on reader views, search traffic, e-mail click-through, and most commented articles.

Bookmark this page so you will always have quick access to Forester Media’s top Erosion Control  … Read More

Glossing Over the Problem

Glossing Over the Problem

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At some point, the editors of all of Forester’s publications have addressed the problems with infrastructure in the US: too little funding, too much needing to be done, too many arguments about what should have the highest priority. You can see a roundup here of some industry experts’ opinions.

It  … Read More

The Many Faces of Permeable Pavers

The Many Faces of Permeable Pavers

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The world of permeable pavers is multifaceted. They come in a variety of shapes and sizes. They can be placed in a wide range of configurations to match tastes, function, or budgets. They can play a central role in meeting a wide variety of water-quality improvement goals. Projects employing permeable  … Read More

Catching Up to What’s Already Here

Catching Up to What’s Already Here

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A debate that’s happening in many different cities across the US is being played out right now in the mid-sized community of Greenville, NC. The city’s population is just shy of 90,000—although there are nearly 175,000 in the entire metropolitan area—and it’s growing at a fairly rapid pace. And that’s  … Read More

The Fog Catchers

The Fog Catchers

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In the 1946 short story “Miss Winters and the Wind,” a woman tries to capture the wind in a bedsheet; the results aren’t quite what she’d intended. Today, a small farming community in Chile is having better luck catching fog in a net.

As we face the possibility of increasingly longer  … Read More

Water—and Tempers—Rising

Water—and Tempers—Rising

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No one particularly wants to live in a flood zone. But deciding just where that zone lies and how great the risk is has been an ongoing struggle, both for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) that creates the nation’s flood maps and for the homeowners who sometimes dispute FEMA’s  … Read More

The Mayor of Nowhere at All

The Mayor of Nowhere at All

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Few of us these days can claim to have lived in the same location since birth; the average American makes more than 11 moves over a lifetime, with jobs, school, and other changes often sending us clear across the country. Still, there are some people who remain where they started  … Read More

The Taj Mahal Effect

The Taj Mahal Effect

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Environmental problems come to light in many different ways; the plight of sea turtles or coral reefs might highlight the dangers of something we’re putting into the water, for instance. Almost as attention-getting as animals in trouble, though, is an iconic building in danger from its environment. The Taj Mahal  … Read More

Devouring the Problem

Devouring the Problem

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In a blog on the Stormwater magazine site a couple of years ago, I mentioned a battle taking place in the Great Lakes; invasive lampreys destroy about 100 million pounds of fish each year, and the Great Lakes Fishery Commission has been spending $20 million a year to try to  … Read More

Dishing the Dirt

Dishing the Dirt

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In the pages of Erosion Control and online, we’ve often debated the pros and cons of dam removal. Demolishing outdated ones—many of which are a century or more old and in danger of collapse, and some of which have outlived their original purpose—can return a river to something closer to  … Read More

The Benefits of Engineered Soils

The Benefits of Engineered Soils

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Engineered soil: it sounds like a new concept, but one historical record notes it is more than 1,000 years old. In the sixth century AD, a group of ascetic monks left the lush, green mainland of Ireland seeking a new, remote environment to practice their dedication and humility. Braving the  … Read More



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