Soil

Erosion Control Weekly

Be Very Afraid

Be Very Afraid

|

With wildfires still raging throughout southern California, it might seem strange to concentrate on a completely different kind of natural disaster. But there are some instructive similarities in what we do—or don’t do—when faced with unpleasant possibilities like fires, earthquakes, and floods.

Lucy Jones is a seismologist who has spent  … Read More

Erosion Control—Reader Favorites

Erosion Control—Reader Favorites

|

Listed below are the top Editor Blogs, Reader Favorite articles, and Erosion Control magazine articles for you to enjoy. This list is curated based on reader views, search traffic, e-mail click-through, and most commented articles.

Bookmark this page so you will always have quick access to Forester Media’s top Erosion Control  … Read More

Erosion Control Devices

Erosion Control Devices

|

No one knows when it happened: some would say perhaps it made no sound, or maybe no one was listening, but something changed in the watershed upstream of several properties in a Noblesville, IN, subdivision. Suddenly, the slope of a streambank in a neighborhood backyard began wasting away.  … Read More

Your Credit Rating Just Got More Complicated

Your Credit Rating Just Got More Complicated

|

One of the tricky things about sea level rise is that it’s not happening equally in all places. Lots of people picture the world’s oceans as a sort of huge bathtub: If you add water, say from melting polar ice, then the level should go up evenly everywhere, right? But  … Read More

The Groundwater Problem

The Groundwater Problem

|

We’ve talked a lot about drought in the US, and although it seems to be lessening in many areas, we’re still drawing heavily on groundwater for irrigation and drinking water supplies—so much so that the ground is subsiding.

We’re not alone, however, and as this article describes, the Middle East—particularly  … Read More

An Ancient Weapon—Literally—Against Erosion

An Ancient Weapon—Literally—Against Erosion

|

The indigenous Chamorro people of the Mariana Islands in the South Pacific have a traditional—and deadly—weapon called the slingstone. As described here, the oval-shaped stones were once carved from limestone or basalt or made from fire-hardened clay. Warriors suspended the stones from a sling, sometimes made from coconut fiber, and  … Read More

Erosion Control for Construction Projects

Erosion Control for Construction Projects

|

Every type of construction project—building, road, bridge—involves erosion control. As soon as removal of an existing structure starts or a shovel turns over grass to expose the soil beneath, the need for erosion control begins.  … Read More

Eating Lunch vs. Being Lunch

Eating Lunch vs. Being Lunch

|

We have an adversarial relationship to fire these days. This year has been one of the worst for wildfires in the US; at various times this fall, more than 2 million acres have been burning at once. The US Fish and Wildlife Service estimated, back in September, that more than  … Read More

Get Organized: A Look at Comprehensive Tool Tracking

Get Organized: A Look at Comprehensive Tool Tracking

|

Sponsored Content
If you’re like most contractors, you’ve invested a lot of money to ensure that your teams have the required tools for completing jobs. However, despite these large investments in tool assets, you might not be tracking their usage and location like you do with your big machinery. We get  … Read More

“Keep the Stubble”

“Keep the Stubble”

|

Don Johnson might have led the trend, way back in the ’80s, toward the stubbled look, but the word is taking on a whole different meaning this month. The Department of Agriculture is encouraging farmers to keep the stubble—that is, the cut stalks left in the field after grain such  … Read More

Fire’s Complicated Aftermath

Fire’s Complicated Aftermath

|

Most of us following the news of the fires in northern California are aware of the immense amount of work that must follow after the flames are out. There’s an urgent need to stabilize the affected areas to prevent erosion and further damage to the region—everything from flooding to mudslides—but  … Read More

Shoreline Protection That Lasts

Shoreline Protection That Lasts

|

The coastal environment constantly ebbs, flows, and shifts. Its dynamic, ever-changing properties provide one of the most habitat-rich ecosystems on the planet and a critical buffer between the ocean and mainland. Frequently, the coast also experiences conflicting human and natural processes; the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science notes that  … Read More



Enter Your Log In Credentials
×