Soil

Erosion Control Weekly

Dishing the Dirt

Dishing the Dirt

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In the pages of Erosion Control and online, we’ve often debated the pros and cons of dam removal. Demolishing outdated ones—many of which are a century or more old and in danger of collapse, and some of which have outlived their original purpose—can return a river to something closer to  … Read More

Erosion Control—Reader Favorites

Erosion Control—Reader Favorites

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Listed below are the top Editor Blogs, Reader Favorite articles, and Erosion Control magazine articles for you to enjoy. This list is curated based on reader views, search traffic, e-mail click-through, and most commented articles.

Bookmark this page so you will always have quick access to Forester Media’s top Erosion Control  … Read More

The Benefits of Engineered Soils

The Benefits of Engineered Soils

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Engineered soil: it sounds like a new concept, but one historical record notes it is more than 1,000 years old. In the sixth century AD, a group of ascetic monks left the lush, green mainland of Ireland seeking a new, remote environment to practice their dedication and humility. Braving the  … Read More

Options for Dust Control

Options for Dust Control

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EPA has a commonly accepted statement on dust: “One car making one pass on one mile of dirt or gravel road one time each day for one year creates one ton of dust.” It doesn’t have a comparable statement regarding horses, but a similar calculation might be possible.  … Read More

Earthquakes, Eruptions, and Evacuation

Earthquakes, Eruptions, and Evacuation

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In the US, we are accustomed to hearing news of—or even experiencing—the damage of natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, and wildfires. Most of us, however, will never have to worry about a volcano erupting nearby—but residents of Hawaii’s Big Island are currently facing that reality. Over 1,700  … Read More

The Dinosaur in the Room

The Dinosaur in the Room

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It might have happened to you at one time or another: A project you were working on got delayed—or, even worse, canceled completely—because historical or archaeological artifacts were discovered at the site. Ideally, an archaeological survey takes place long before work begins, but every so often something is uncovered during  … Read More

Gabions and Channel Stabilization

Gabions and Channel Stabilization

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Perhaps nothing tests the stabilization of a channel or streambank like a significant flood event, such as Hurricane Harvey delivered in 2017. Such events highlight whether a long-established gabion installation has withstood the test of time.  … Read More

Treasures in the Mud

Treasures in the Mud

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Several weeks ago, Japanese researchers announced the discovery of a treasure trove off the coast of Minamitori Island: a tremendous amount of rare-earth minerals. As this article notes, rare-earth elements—17 in all, including the lanthanides plus scandium and yttrium—are much in demand for a growing number of high-tech applications like  … Read More

Porous Pavers: Improving Water Quality

Porous Pavers: Improving Water Quality

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Permeable pavement is taking center stage now as erosion control and stormwater green infrastructure projects aim to reduce runoff and improve water quality.

Stopping Nonpoint-Source Pollution
In Columbia, MO, the Public Works Department received a Clean Water Act 319 grant for stormwater improvements to reduce nonpoint-source pollution into the creeks and streams.  … Read More

A Long Dry Spell

A Long Dry Spell

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As of mid-April, one-third of the continental US is considered to be in a state of drought. The area affected is increasing, and various cities and states are considering making their temporary water restrictions permanent—perhaps a sign that we’re starting to consider the drought the new normal.

As this article  … Read More

The Birds, the Bees, and the Lawsuit

The Birds, the Bees, and the Lawsuit

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Two projects in different parts of the country are highlighting the potential conflict between the needs of the people and the needs of wildlife. Both illustrate, in different ways, the tricky juggling act agencies like the US Army Corps of Engineers must perform to balance diverse—sometimes incompatible—priorities as they manage  … Read More

Fugitive Dust Control and Road Stabilization

Fugitive Dust Control and Road Stabilization

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Whether fugitive dust comes from mining activities, country roads, open land, or elsewhere, federal governments in North America and in other countries around the world have been tightening their dust control regulations.  … Read More



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