Soil

Erosion Control Weekly

A Long Dry Spell

A Long Dry Spell

|

As of mid-April, one-third of the continental US is considered to be in a state of drought. The area affected is increasing, and various cities and states are considering making their temporary water restrictions permanent—perhaps a sign that we’re starting to consider the drought the new normal.

As this article  … Read More

Erosion Control—Reader Favorites

Erosion Control—Reader Favorites

|

Listed below are the top Editor Blogs, Reader Favorite articles, and Erosion Control magazine articles for you to enjoy. This list is curated based on reader views, search traffic, e-mail click-through, and most commented articles.

Bookmark this page so you will always have quick access to Forester Media’s top Erosion Control  … Read More

Close Together, Arms Above Your Head

Close Together, Arms Above Your Head

|

Last Saturday, March 3, was World Wildlife Day. No doubt we all want to protect wildlife, but some folks—especially on the East Coast—are finding they have too much of a good thing.

As I wrote in the magazine last year, trees are making a comeback in New England and other  … Read More

Protecting Storm Drains and Inlets From Sediment and Pollutants

Protecting Storm Drains and Inlets From Sediment and Pollutants

|

The trouble with stormwater runoff is that it travels along the ground surface and over pavement, picking up sediment and other contaminants as it goes. A well-designed surface water runoff collection and drainage system will funnel runoff from relatively large areas into individual collection points such as inlets and drains  … Read More

Saving Giraffes, Competing With Elephants

Saving Giraffes, Competing With Elephants

|

An adult elephant can drink up to 50 gallons of water at a time. Keep reading to see why that might be relevant.

We often talk about the effects of prolonged drought: The loss of trees and vegetation it causes, the resulting erosion and dust, the drinking water shortages—some drastic,  … Read More

Armoring Against Erosion

Armoring Against Erosion

|

It’s easy to assume that with sophisticated computer simulations, wireless monitoring, and engineered materials, we’ve conquered water management, but a look into our past might just dampen this hubris. When it comes to erosion control, everything old (really is) new again.  … Read More

Into the Woods

Into the Woods

|

How much time do you spend in the forest? According to an organization that dedicates a lot of effort to studying these things, the average American visits a wooded area—and this can include an urban forest—110 days each year.

Recreation is only a small part of what forests provide, though,  … Read More

How to Define “Public Benefit”?

How to Define “Public Benefit”?

|

The drought is far from over, and many California communities are preparing for future water scarcity better than they have before, or at least trying to, by enlarging their reservoirs. But they’re hitting a snag when they try to get state funding for building new dams or otherwise expanding their  … Read More

A Million Tons Down

A Million Tons Down

|

As milestones go, this is a somewhat disheartening one: A California paper reports that one million tons of debris from the fires last October in the northern part of the state have now been removed. Good that it’s done, of course, but the number just emphasizes the scope of the  … Read More

Should We Leave It Alone?

Should We Leave It Alone?

|

It’s tempting, after a disaster of any proportion, to do something immediately to try to fix the situation. In the case of wildfire, revegetating the burned area quickly is often seen as an essential step, especially if the fire occurs just before the rainy season, to prevent erosion, flooding, and—in  … Read More

Seeding for Progress and Restoration

Seeding for Progress and Restoration

|

The Palouse region of eastern Washington is known as one of the most fertile expanses of land in the world, with rich topsoil plunging to a depth of 100 feet or more. As Kurt Merg, vegetation ecologist for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, explains, it is one of  … Read More



Enter Your Log In Credentials
×