Water

Stormwater Weekly

The Smallest Apartment in the World

The Smallest Apartment in the World

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The size of the average new single-family home in the US is now more than 2,600 square feet, having grown over the decades. In the 1970s, it was just under 1,800 square feet.  In 1900—when families tended to be much larger—the average home ranged from 700 to 1,200 square feet.  … Read More

Dead in the Water

Dead in the Water

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What happens when we die? Allow me to rephrase: what happens to our bodies when we die?

The earth is, generally, a great filter. Slowing down and infiltrating stormwater reduces pollutants and recharges aquifers and groundwater supplies. But as we know, anything that goes in or on the ground has  … Read More

A Burning Question

A Burning Question

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Just in time for summer, the state of Hawaii is trying to eliminate some forms of sunscreen lotion. Two common chemicals in sunscreen products, oxybenzone and octinoxate, have been shown to kill marine life, particularly coral. Last week, Hawaii’s state legislature voted to ban the sale of the two chemicals  … Read More

Stormwater – Reader Favorites

Stormwater – Reader Favorites

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Listed below are the top Editor blogs, Reader Favorite articles, and Stormwater magazine articles for you to enjoy. This list is curated based on reader views, search traffic, email click-through, and most commented articles.

Bookmark this page so you will always have quick access to Forester Media’s top Stormwater content.  … Read More

Improving Water Quality With Mowers

Improving Water Quality With Mowers

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Mowers are, literally and figuratively, the cutting edge for managing vegetation. And with new technologies and designs, they offer solutions that are also cost-effective.  … Read More

Battling Invasive Species

Battling Invasive Species

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When William Shakespeare introduced the starling into his play Henry IV more than 400 years ago, he recognized the bird’s moderately annoying qualities by imagining it tormenting its host with the repetition of a single utterance—over and over and over. However, he certainly could have had no concept that his  … Read More

Going to the Dogs

Going to the Dogs

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Oh, the irony. Last week, a Boston-area neighborhood was flooded after a storm drain clogged. When city workers in Canton, MA, delved into the problem, they found a 3,600-foot-long blockage inside a drainage pipe.

Now, we know all sorts of materials can cause clogged pipes. Disposable wipes—now almost universally known  … Read More

Stormwater Treatment With a Different Face

Stormwater Treatment With a Different Face

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Managing stormwater is usually a utilitarian function. Occasionally it can rise to an art.

A number of facilities combine stormwater treatment with another role, such as providing green space or recreational facilities for the public at large. One of these is Indianapolis’s Cultural Trail, an 8-mile walking, jogging, and biking  … Read More

The $10 Million Phosphorus Race

The $10 Million Phosphorus Race

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In the 1963 movie It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad World, a group of strangers competed to find $350,000 of stolen, buried cash. Today, that amount sounds much less impressive than it used to, but a much different group is racing to win $10 million by solving a persistent water-quality problem:  … Read More

Rehabilitating Stormwater Pipe

Rehabilitating Stormwater Pipe

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In the booming 1990s, Orange County took a close look at its growing—and aging—water infrastructure to make decisions about maintaining and upgrading it. They decided to contract outside their own stormwater department for making the repairs to the system. The Stormwater Management Division in Orange County has been through many  … Read More

Amphibious Architecture

Amphibious Architecture

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In The Wizard of Oz, Dorothy’s house was carried off by a tornado. In real life, depending on where you live, your house is probably more likely to get swept away by water than by wind, but there’s a possibility that, like Dorothy’s, it might just stay in one piece.  … Read More

A Grim Reminder, With a Better Ending

A Grim Reminder, With a Better Ending

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By now you’ve probably seen or read reports about the 13-year-old boy in Los Angeles who, on Easter Sunday, fell into a sewer pipe. He was carried downstream and rescued—13 hours and three-quarters of a mile later—alive and unharmed.

The boy, Jesse Hernandez, was lucky, and so were the many rescue  … Read More



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