Tag: floodplain

A floodplain or flood plain is an area of land adjacent to a stream or river that stretches from the banks of its channel to the base of the enclosing valley walls and experiences flooding during periods of high discharge. It includes the floodway, which consists of the stream channel and adjacent areas that actively carry flood flows downstream, and the flood fringe, which are areas inundated by the flood, but which do not experience a strong current. In other words, a floodplain is an area near a river or a stream which floods when the water level reaches flood stage.

The Flood Insurance Dilemma

The Flood Insurance Dilemma

Here’s a quick quiz: which of the 50 states has the highest hidden flood risk? (Scroll down for the answer.)

You might guess Florida—I did—but that low-lying coastal state, in fact, comes in second. And although Florida does have the greatest overall flood risk, hidden risk is something different: it

Looking Back—and Forward—in Biloxi

Looking Back—and Forward—in Biloxi

On August 29, 2005, the wind along the Gulf Coast was blowing with unprecedented force; water levels from storm surge were rising to record levels. Hurricane Katrina swept through, causing damage on a scale that had not been seen there since 1969’s Hurricane Camille, three and a half decades earlier.

Challenges to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP)

Challenges to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP)

Challenges to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) have been increasing in intensity for years. If the NFIP is not reauthorized by elected federal officials by the September 30 deadline—something still undetermined as we go to press with this article—existing flood insurance policies will remain intact, but new ones cannot

Project Profile: Set Your Watch by the ADT’s

Project Profile: Set Your Watch by the ADT’s

Developments around Vancouver, British Columbia, show no signs of slowing down. In fact, Vancouver, like much of the West Coast in the United States, remains a hotbed for real estate developers. Just south of Vancouver in Tsawwassen, crews are moving materials to make way for Phase 2 of the Aquilini

Transforming Springfield’s Mill Race Into a Community Asset

Transforming Springfield’s Mill Race Into a Community Asset

The Mill Race Stormwater Facility, one of the largest regional water quality treatment ponds in the city of Springfield, OR, includes a vegetated drainage swale, trailhead, and a multi-use path enhancing the historic Mill Race for recreational values and wildlife habitat. The project included the involvement of multi-disciplinary local agencies

Paying for Damages

Paying for Damages

Challenges to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) have been increasing in intensity for years. If the NFIP is not reauthorized by elected federal officials by the September 30 deadline—something still undetermined as we go to press with this article—existing flood insurance policies will remain intact, but new ones cannot

College Stormwater Programs

College Stormwater Programs

Not too long ago, there were only two colleges in the United States where one could learn about stormwater management, notes Brant Keller, public works director for Griffin, GA.

Stormwater Goes to School

Not too long ago, there were only two colleges in the United States where one could learn about stormwater management, notes Brant Keller, public works director for Griffin, GA.

Project Profile: Munoz Flats Habitat Improvement Project Future

Project Profile: Munoz Flats Habitat Improvement Project Future

MUNOZ FLATS WAS HISTORICALLY part of the floodplain of the San Juan River in northwestern New Mexico. A project was developed to enhance wildlife habitat, create more opportunities for fishing and hunting, and improve access to the San Juan River. Project funding was provided by the New Mexico Department of

Permeable Surfaces

Permeable Surfaces

The vast expanses of impermeable asphalt surfaces blanketing the country and crisscrossing every urban center and thoroughfare from the east to west add up to a total of 4.12 million miles—enough to circle the Earth’s equator 157 times over. While it might be easy to take impermeable pavement for granted

Enter Your Log In Credentials
×