Tag: hydrology

Editor’s Comments: All in a Day’s Work

Editor’s Comments: All in a Day’s Work

If you stand back and look at what you’ve done on the job over the last few months or the past year, what comes to mind? Are you doing what you thought you’d be doing when you started out? Are there pieces of your job that surprise you? Anything you

Natural Stream Channel Restoration

Natural Stream Channel Restoration

EPA protects water quality by regulating municipal separate storm sewer systems (MS4s) to reduce the pollutants that stormwater runoff carries into storm sewers. Nonpoint source pollutants from impervious surfaces such as oil, grease (hydrocarbons), heavy metals from vehicles and atmospheric deposition, fertilizers, pesticides, and sediments are commonly picked up by

Erosion Control Devices

Erosion Control Devices

No one knows when it happened: some would say perhaps it made no sound, or maybe no one was listening, but something changed in the watershed upstream of several properties in a Noblesville, IN, subdivision. Suddenly, the slope of a streambank in a neighborhood backyard began wasting away.

Stormwater Monitoring

Stormwater Monitoring

The most dramatic and identifying characteristic of water is that it is always moving. Even so-called standing water is never completely static; it’s either being drawn by gravity to seep down into the earth or being agitated by warmth at the surface to rise into the air as a vapor.

Pipeline Reclamation: A Growing Field

Pipeline Reclamation: A Growing Field

Increasing miles of pipeline are being built to transport oil and natural gas across the US. More miles of pipeline equals a larger need for reclamation of those rights of way (ROWs) that have been affected by the excavation. Many companies entering the reclamation field or contracting such services have

Reader Profile: Chris Lochra

Reader Profile: Chris Lochra

Flooding anywhere can cause significant life loss and property damage, but geography often dictates the extent of the damage. The chief concerns in Colorado are flash flood events, partly driven by monsoons in the front mountain range out to the Eastern Plains, notes Chris Lochra.

Making Every Drop Count

Making Every Drop Count

The most dramatic and identifying characteristic of water is that it is always moving. Even so-called standing water is never completely static; it’s either being drawn by gravity to seep down into the earth or being agitated by warmth at the surface to rise into the air as a vapor.

Reader Profile: John Whittingham

Reader Profile: John Whittingham

Rills and gullies on disturbed landscapes are as intriguing as they are destructive, notes John Whittingham. Accelerated soil loss resulting from human activities has always captivated Whittingham’s interest. Growing up in Colorado Springs, CO, during the 1960s and 1970s, Whittingham was often found hiking through deep ravines caused by construction-site

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