Tag: national pollutant discharge elimination system

The NPDES permits program is authorized by CWA section 402. The initial permits issued in the 1970s and early 1980s focused on POTWs and industrial wastewater—typically “process” wastewater and cooling water where applicable, and in some cases, industrial stormwater. The 1987 WQA expanded the program to cover stormwater discharges explicitly, both from municipal separate storm sewer systems (MS4) and industrial sources. The MS4 NPDES permits require regulated municipalities to use Best Management Practices to reduce pollutants to the “Maximum Extent Practicable.”

Phosphorous Removal

Phosphorous Removal

FOR MANY RESIDENTS in Southwestern Idaho, the Boise River is an iconic and essential element of the City of Boise, providing untold economic, aesthetic, wildlife, and recreational benefits. For a body of water of its size and importance to the community, water quality protection is essential to the sustainability and

Movin’ Down the Highway

Movin’ Down the Highway

Two decades ago, while working as the erosion control supervisor in Orange County, NC, Warren Faircloth, the then-county inspector, frequently observed a recurring problem with sediment control on construction projects.

Testing Inlet and Storm Drain Protection Devices

Testing Inlet and Storm Drain Protection Devices

Urban stormwater runoff is one of the leading causes of water pollution because it carries pollutants such as oil, grease, pesticides, fertilizer, animal waste, trash, debris, and other substances through storm drains and into lakes, rivers, and other bodies of water.

Working Hard for the Money

Working Hard for the Money

It’s not cheap to run a landfill. The costs vary by location, but estimates by the Environmental Protection Agency and various state agencies range from $300,000 to $800,000 per acre for the application, construction, and design and engineering, with as much as $100,000 per acre for overhead and quality control—costs

Meaningful Dry-Weather Flow Reductions

Meaningful Dry-Weather Flow Reductions

Dry-weather runoff, or non-stormwater discharge, is flow that enters the municipal separate storm sewer system (MS4) from a combination of activities including lawn watering, over-irrigation, car washing, illegal discharges, and groundwater seepage. These flows, often called “urban drool,” pose an environmental threat due in large part to the trash, sediment,

Testing the Waters

Testing the Waters

Urban stormwater runoff is one of the leading causes of water pollution because it carries pollutants such as oil, grease, pesticides, fertilizer, animal waste, trash, debris, and other substances through storm drains and into lakes, rivers, and other bodies of water.

Project Profile: A Challenging Site in Seattle

Project Profile: A Challenging Site in Seattle

The Interbay neighborhood of Seattle, WA, has a long history of industry. It is home to an 80-acre railway yard, the Port of Seattle’s commercial fishing fleet and cruise ship dock, a US military armory and storage facility with a long history of environmental concern, light industrial facilities, and miscellaneous

City of Boise and Brown and Caldwell Recognized for National Engineering Excellence

City of Boise and Brown and Caldwell Recognized for National Engineering Excellence

WALNUT CREEK, Calif. — The City of Boise and Brown and Caldwell today announced receivership of a national honor in the American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) 51st Engineering Excellence Awards competition.

Known industry-wide as engineering’s “Academy Awards”— the competition concludes with a gala celebrating U.S. engineering firms for projects demonstrating

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