Tag: rain barrels

A rainwater tank (sometimes called a rain barrel in North America in reference to smaller tanks, or a water butt in the UK) is a water tank used to collect and store rain water runoff, typically from rooftops via rain gutters. A rainwater catchment or collection (also known as “rainwater harvesting”) system can yield 2358 litres (623 gal) of water from 2.54 cm (1 in) of rain on a 93 m2 (1,000 sq ft) roof. Rainwater tanks are devices for collecting and maintaining harvested rain.

Rainwater Harvesting

Rainwater Harvesting

Although various forms of rainwater harvesting have been used for thousands of years, as an organized industry, it is still in its infancy. At present, no national standards are in place regulating its use, although various states and municipalities have begun promulgating laws concerning how rainwater may (or may not)

One Way to Get Their Attention

One Way to Get Their Attention

Last December, a sinkhole opened up in the town of Fraser, MI—on Christmas Eve, no less. The cause was a broken 11-foot-diameter sewer pipe located 55 feet underground. The hole eventually measured 250 by 100 feet, causing nearly two dozen homes to be temporarily evacuated. A few are damaged so

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NEPTUNE TECHNOLOGY GROUP
Neptune’s E-Coder R900i combination absolute encoder register and radio frequency meter interface unit makes it easy to migrate from walk-by, to mobile, to fixed network data collection, while offering advanced smart metering. The E-Coder R900i’s two-way communications and interleaved mobile and high-power fixed network messages eliminate the need for site visits or

Water Storage Systems

Water Storage Systems

There are two minimum requirements for civilization: a sewage system to carry away wastewater, and a consistent and reliable water supply system to provide water for drinking, bathing, and irrigation. A water supply system consists of several components. These include a source of water (groundwater, freshwater pond or lake, man-made

Some Random Facts About Water Harvesting

Some Random Facts About Water Harvesting

In May 2016, the governor of Colorado signed a bill legalizing rain barrels. Before then, the capture and use of rainwater, even on so small a scale, was illegal in Colorado. It wasn’t the first time such a bill had been proposed—a similar effort failed last year—and the decision, hailed

Madison, Wisconsin: Capital Stormwater Management

Madison, Wisconsin: Capital Stormwater Management

Two entities are the major players for stormwater projects—green and gray—in Madison. One of those players is the city itself, which as of 2014 had a population more than 245,000. The other is the University of Wisconsin’s (UW’s) main branch. Its flagship campus of the UW system covers 936 acres

A Sophick Mercury of Our Own?

A Sophick Mercury of Our Own?

The Chemical Heritage Foundation in Philadelphia recently acquired a handwritten manuscript penned by Isaac Newton roughly 400 years ago. It’s the physicist’s copy of an earlier document written by an alchemist, George Starkey, and it contains directions for creating “sophick mercury,” an ingredient of the mythical philosopher’s stone, which alchemists

The Water Storage Trio

The Water Storage Trio

Public water suppliers typically need three types of potable water storage: equalization, fire suppression, and emergency. Although any or all may be included in a single storage facility, each has a specific purpose and specific requirements.

Embracing the Bog

Embracing the Bog

After experiencing record floods earlier this year, people in South Carolina are understandably interested in what can be done to avoid a similar situation in the future. Of course, several things contributed to the flooding situation in October, and there is no single remedy or talisman to prevent it from

Writing the Menu for the Chesapeake Bay “Pollution Diet”

Writing the Menu for the Chesapeake Bay “Pollution Diet”

The largest estuary in North America is the Chesapeake Bay with its 8,000-mile shoreline and a whopping 64,000-square-mile watershed. Maryland and Virginia comprise the shoreline states, but the watershed extends to parts of West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, all of the District of Columbia, and, incredibly, as far north as the

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