Tag: rainwater harvesting

Rainwater harvesting is the accumulation and deposition of rainwater for reuse on-site, rather than allowing it to run off. Rainwater can be collected from rivers or roofs, and in many places the water collected is redirected to a deep pit (well, shaft, or borehole), a reservoir with percolation, or collected from dew or fog with nets or other tools. Its uses include water for gardens, livestock, irrigation, domestic use with proper treatment, and indoor heating for houses etc. The harvested water can also be used as drinking water, longer-term storage and for other purposes such as groundwater recharge.

Self-Sufficient and Off the Grid

Self-Sufficient and Off the Grid

Earlier this week, Water Efficiency’s Laura Sanchez wrote about a method of generating potable water from the atmosphere by collecting the condensation from a car’s air conditioning coils or from household appliances. It’s a worthwhile goal, whether your main concern is conserving water or avoiding plastic water bottles. There’s a

New Sizing Metrics for Water Storage

New Sizing Metrics for Water Storage

Fire flow needs and regulations have always dominated the metrics for sizing the water storage capacity of a municipality or business. But these days, climate change, drought, and population growth have entered the picture as additional factors requiring consideration.

The StormCon 2018 Call for Papers Is Open

The StormCon 2018 Call for Papers Is Open

StormCon, the conference dedicated exclusively to stormwater, is now accepting abstracts for 2018. The conference will take place in Denver, CO, August 11–16, 2018. The deadline to submit an abstract is Wednesday, December 6, 2017.

We’re seeking presentations in six conference tracks, described below. Based on feedback from those of you

The StormCon 2018 Call for Papers Is Open

The StormCon 2018 Call for Papers Is Open

StormCon, the conference dedicated exclusively to stormwater, is now accepting abstracts for 2018. The conference will take place in Denver, CO, August 11–16, 2018. The deadline to submit an abstract is Wednesday, December 6, 2017.

We’re seeking presentations in six conference tracks, described below. Based on feedback from those of you

Techniques for Successful Sediment Control

Techniques for Successful Sediment Control

Siltation in water containment structures is problematic, resulting in the loss of space in tanks and other structures such as reservoirs, ponds, and catch basins. It also increases the cost of treating drinking water, with high loads interfering with coagulation, filtration, and disinfection.

Silt Management

Silt Management

Siltation in water containment structures is problematic, resulting in the loss of space in tanks and other structures such as reservoirs, ponds, and catch basins. It also increases the cost of treating drinking water, with high loads interfering with coagulation, filtration, and disinfection.

Rainwater Harvesting

Rainwater Harvesting

Although various forms of rainwater harvesting have been used for thousands of years, as an organized industry, it is still in its infancy. At present, no national standards are in place regulating its use, although various states and municipalities have begun promulgating laws concerning how rainwater may (or may not)

EPA Announces Winners of the Fifth Annual Campus RainWorks Challenge

EPA Announces Winners of the Fifth Annual Campus RainWorks Challenge

WASHINGTON—The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today announced the winners of its fifth annual Campus RainWorks Challenge, a national college competition to engage the next generation to design solutions for stormwater pollution using green infrastructure. Student teams proposed designs that help aid innovative problem solving for their campus and community.

Stormwater is

Challenges of Urban Water Infrastructure

Challenges of Urban Water Infrastructure

AT PRESENT, 80.7% OF the US population resides in urban areas (US Census Bureau 2012). Increased urbanization (paved areas and buildings) and urban population growth has exerted significant pressure on urban water demand and expansion of urban water infrastructure—i.e., potable water supplies, wastewater treatment and discharge, and urban stormwater runoff

Urban Water Management

Urban Water Management

AT PRESENT, 80.7% OF the US population resides in urban areas (US Census Bureau 2012). Increased urbanization (paved areas and buildings) and urban population growth has exerted significant pressure on urban water demand and expansion of urban water infrastructure—i.e., potable water supplies, wastewater treatment and discharge, and urban stormwater runoff

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